#09-06-03-004E: Intermittent No Crank/No Start, No Module Communication, MIL, Warning - Chevrolet Colorado & GMC Canyon Forum
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Old 01-29-2012, 02:30 PM   #1
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#09-06-03-004E: Intermittent No Crank/No Start, No Module Communication, MIL, Warning

#09-06-03-004E: Intermittent No Crank/No Start, No Module Communication, MIL, Warning Lights, Vehicle Messages or DTCs Set by Various Control Modules - Diagnosing and Repairing Fretting Corrosion (Disconnect Affected Connector and Apply Dielectric Lubricant) - (Nov 28, 2011)

Subject:Intermittent No Crank/No Start, No Module Communication, MIL, Warning Lights, Vehicle Messages or DTCs Set by Various Control Modules – Diagnosing and Repairing Fretting Corrosion (Disconnect Affected Connector and Apply Dielectric Lubricant)

Models:2013 and Prior GM Passenger Cars and Trucks

This in RED is from the BCM replacement on a Colorado/Canyon
Important:
•The ignition switch should be in the OFF position when connecting or disconnecting the connectors to the body control module (BCM).
•Always disconnect the black body wiring harness connector FIRST and the gray instrument panel (I/P) wiring harness connector LAST.
•!Always connect the black body wiring harness connector FIRST and the gray I/P wiring harness LAST.
•Do not open the BCM housing. The module does not have any serviceable components. The module may be replaced only as an assembly.


Attention: This repair can be applied to ANY electrical connection including, but not limited to: lighting, body electrical, in-line connections, powertrain control sensors, etc. DO NOT over apply lubricant to the point where it prevents the full engagement of sealed connectors. A light coating on the terminal surfaces is sufficient to correct the condition.
This bulletin is being revised to add the 2012-2013 model years, update the information and remove the Warranty Information for Saab Models. Please discard Corporate Bulletin Number
09-06-03-004D (Section 06 – Engine/Propulsion System).


Condition
Some customers may comment on any of the following conditions:

•An intermittent no crank/no start
•Intermittent malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) illumination
•Intermittent service lamp illumination
•Intermittent service message or messages being displayed
The technician may determine that he is unable to duplicate the intermittent condition.

Cause
This condition may be caused by a buildup of non-conductive insulating oxidized debris known as fretting corrosion, occurring between two electrical contact surfaces of the connection or connector. This may be caused by any of the following conditions:

•Vibration
•Thermal cycling
•Poor connection/terminal retention
•Micro motion
•A connector, component or wiring harness not properly secured resulting in movement
On low current signal circuits this condition may cause high resistance, resulting in intermittent connections.

On high current power circuits this condition may cause permanent increases in the resistance and may cause a device to become inoperative.

Representative List of Control Modules and Components

The following is only a representative list of control modules and components that may be affected by this connection or connector condition and DOES NOT include every possible module or component for every vehicle.
•Blower Control Module
•Body Control Module (BCM)
•Communication Interface Module (CIM)
•Cooling Fan Control Module
•Electronic Brake Control Module (EBCM)
•Electronic Brake and Traction Control Module (EBTCM)
•Electronic Suspension Control (ESC) Module
•Engine Control Module (ECM)
•Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Control Module
•HVAC Actuator
•Inflatable Restraint Sensing and Diagnostic Module (SDM)
-Any AIR BAG module
-Seat Belt Lap Anchor Pretensioner
-Seat Belt Retractor Pretensioner
-An SIR system connection or connector condition resulting in the following DTCs being set: B0015, B0016, B0019, B0020, B0022, or B0023
•Powertrain Control Module (PCM)
•Remote Control Door Lock Receiver (RCDLR)
•Transmission Control Module (TCM)


Correction

Important: DO NOT replace the control module, wiring or component for the following conditions:
•The condition is intermittent and cannot be duplicated.
•The condition is present and by disconnecting and reconnecting the connector the condition can no longer be duplicated.
Use the following procedure to correct either of the conditions listed above.

1.Install a scan tool and perform the Diagnostic System Check – Vehicle. Retrieve and record any existing History, Current, Passed and Failed and Failed Current DTCs from all of the control modules.
⇒ If any DTCs are set, refer to Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) List – Vehicle to identify the connector(s) of the control module/component which may be causing the condition. Refer to SI.
⇒ If DTCs are not set, refer to Symptoms – Vehicle to identify the connector(s) of the control module/component which may be causing the condition. Refer to SI.

2.When identified, use the appropriate DTC Diagnostics, Symptoms, Schematics, Component Connector End Views and Component Locator documents to locate and disconnect the affected harness connector or connectors that are causing the conditions.

Note:Fretting corrosion looks like little dark smudges on electrical terminals and appear where the actual electrical contact is being made. In less severe cases it may be unable to be seen or identified without the use of a magnifying glass.

Important: DO NOT apply an excessive amount of dielectric lubricant to the connector as shown, as hydrolock may result when attempting to mate the connector.Use ONLY a clean nylon brush that is dedicated to the repair of the conditions in this bulletin.

3.With a one-inch nylon bristle brush, apply dielectric lubricant to both the module/component side and the harness side of the affected connector.

4.Reconnect the affected connector and wipe away any excess lubricant that may be present.

5.Attempt to duplicate the condition by using the following information:
-DTC Diagnostic Procedure
-Circuit/System Description
-Conditions for Running the DTC
-Conditions for Setting the DTC
-Diagnostic Aids
-Circuit/System Verification
⇒ If the condition cannot be duplicated, the repair is complete.
⇒ If the condition can be duplicated, then follow the appropriate DTC, Symptom or Circuit/System Testing procedure. Refer to SI.


Parts Information : Dielectric Lubricant (50 gram tube) Part Number 12377900 (U.S.) 10953529 (Canada)



GM bulletins are intended for use by professional technicians, NOT a "do-it-yourselfer".!@# They are written to inform these technicians of conditions that may occur on some vehicles, or to provide information that could assist in the proper service of a vehicle.!@# Properly trained technicians have the equipment, tools, safety instructions, and know-how to do a job properly and safely.!@# If a condition is described, DO NOT assume that the bulletin applies to your vehicle, or that your vehicle will have that condition.!@# See your GM dealer for information on whether your vehicle may benefit from the information.

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Old 01-29-2012, 11:41 PM   #2
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Re: #09-06-03-004E: Intermittent No Crank/No Start, No Module Communication, MIL, War

Thanks for posting this. The dealership had my truck for almost six weeks for all of the symptoms in this bulletin, and I still don't think it's fixed right.
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Old 01-30-2012, 02:08 AM   #3
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Re: #09-06-03-004E: Intermittent No Crank/No Start, No Module Communication, MIL, War

Subscribed.. .. history for my truck GM dealer shows few years back intermittent start issue couldn't be duplicated, nothing done! I'll keep this in mind if it happens again!
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Old 06-10-2012, 12:24 PM   #4
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Re: #09-06-03-004E: Intermittent No Crank/No Start, No Module Communication, MIL, War

This problem is mostly likely why here where I live a lot of shops make a killing replacing parts that don't need replacing at all.
As far as the connector problem, I call it "chip creep" (a computer tech term) because the same issue happens to computers as does a vehicle.
On trick you can do, when the connector is apart. If you can get at the contact area with a small pencil eraser and rub the surface (does wonders for computer components) to remove the carbon, then do the anti corrosion lube as stated by other members. And that's about it, but also check the wire for flexibility (don't twist it) about an inch before the connector. If it is brittle, then it is burnt inside and not providing the proper voltage. Incorrect voltage or current is all it takes to mess up a sensor. Same thing happens to computers.
I fix computers. I always "push" connectors together when checking under the hood to eliminate chip creep.

Last edited by MyGMCCanyon; 06-10-2012 at 12:27 PM. Reason: to add info.
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