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That’s how your open differential works. The tire with the least traction/resistance gets the power. That’s why only one wheel spins but when you stop it with your boot that has more resistance/traction so the power is sent to the other side. A differential locker is the way to get power to both sides equally.

As far as the front spinning faster than the rear I’m at a loss. I suspect that being off the ground will cause some issues in that regard.
Just curious as I am 4wd challenged. If the OP has a locking rear differential and both rear tires are spinning would they turn more slowly than a single tire spinning on the front with the open differential? Another question: are all 4wd trucks equipped with locking differentials?
 

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They should rotate at the same speed front to rear whether a locker is used or not. The transfer case splits the power 50/50 front to rear so everything should be equal.

Not all 4wd trucks have a locking differential. It's a feature typically reserved for more off-road orientated vehicles. That being said, the Colorados did have a G80 rear locker offered on certain models. The G80 locker engages when it detects a difference in the passenger/driver wheel speed.

I personally don't care for the G80 locker design and removed it from my rear axle and replaced it with a selectable locker. A front locker from a Hummer H3 can be installed in a 1st Gen front differential but they weren't an option on any 1st Gen Colorado. I installed one a few years ago and it worked well until I did my SAS.
Okay, I think I understand, thanks.
 
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