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I've meticulously maintained this truck and it looks and drives like brand new. Or, it used to. When I crank it up in the morning, it cranks up fine, runs for a few seconds, then shuts off. It immediately cranks back up again and runs perfectly until I shut it off and we do the same song and dance all over again.
I've checked fuel pressure and it was within specs, I've replaced fuel filter, cleaned throttle body and replaced plugs and air filter.
I guess I've assumed it's a fuel delivery problem. Also, all vacuum lines have been replaced.
This morning, it cranked up, ran and shut off and when I went to crank it up - nothing! No click or anything at all. After turning the key about a dozen times, it cranked right up. So now, I'm wondering if it might be an electrical issue. When it cranked up it didn't turn slowly or in any way indicate a battery problem.
Any input would be appreciated. This is not a daily driver, but something I plan to give my grandson one day.
Thanks in advance for any ideas.
 

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I would check the switch itself first, make sure the 12V+ are constant both in & out. I have no other clue on that vintage of Fords. I did drive one of those (as designated driver) when they were new. We did three or four 400 mile RT fishing trips with fairly heavy loads before I realized that it wasn't a V8. So I guess I have to rate it as a good truck.
 

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As an owner of a 1989 F350, I have experienced a similar condition, except mine was in a more advanced state. When I bought the truck, the problem was already in this state, so I don’t know how it had advanced to that point.

My truck would start and run while the outside temperature was cool, as in cool to a human, and would die once the engine warmed up, not restarting until the truck cooled off. If the ambient temperature was warm, it would crank all day, but never start.

To solve my problem, I replaced the ignition control module, ignition coil, and the stator (which is sometimes referred to as the Hall effect sensor or ignition pickup coil). Two of these parts can be replaced without too much major disassembly, but the stator requires nearly complete disassembly of the distributor. All of the three parts must be replaced at the same time, and the brand on all three should be Motorcraft. My price for these three parts was $300-$350 through the Ford parts website. The theory behind replacing all three parts at the same time is that as one part becomes weak and eventually fails, the other two must make a greater effort in order to keep the truck running, which damages those components as well. Also, when installing the ignition control module, be sure to put more than enough heat insulating grease on the flat metal side. Better to put too much on and have to wipe it up than have too little on it, as that can cause the module to fail, setting you up to do this repair all over again.

It sounds like you already know this, but just in case, before throwing these parts at the problem, grab a repair manual that has component testing procedures and known good values for components. From looking around other forums, it seems that Haynes has the better diy repair manual, specifically the older red cover version. I got my copy for $10-$15 on eBay. Only test the components when the symptoms of the problem are present.

Now, my truck has the 7.5L, but this problem is fairly common on all gasoline Ford full-size trucks and Broncos from 1980-1996. Hopefully this helps you to get your truck running like it should.
 
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