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Discussion Starter #1
So I have some knowledge of drum brakes i.e. I know how to make my way through a brake job. Due to this limited knowledge, I don't have much experience with diagnosing squeaks or squeals from the drums. At first I thought it to be my front brakes and have since took them off and put brake lubricant on the pads. The noise stopped for a day or so but has started up again. I have been able to determine the noise is coming from the rear. I am not sure if there is something I can put on the drum or pads to stop or at least quiet the noise, that is if nothing needs to be replaced. Any tips on what I can do?
 

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If you pull the drums off and look closely, you will see that the metal part of the shoes rub on the backing plate in certain raised spots. I would suggest that you find some high temp lubricant, pry the shoe away from the backing plate and use a Q tip top apply a small amount of that lube at the spots that make contact. You won't want, or need, to apply very much. That is the most common cause of drum brake noise.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I just bought the truck 2 weeks ago and so I would hope I don't need to replace anything. I am hope it's the simple fix of moving the pads and adding some lubricant. Most people ask why I don't it back to the dealership and I reply if they didn't fix stuff right before putting up for sale, what makes you think they will do a better job now? Also, I trust myself more.
 

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The dealer only needs to do a brake inspection to be sure they meet standards. Not fix squeaks or give a brake job due to "I want to sell it with new brakes".

It's always a buyer beware when purchasing used. It's too late for you know, but for others it's a good reminder to have a used vehicle checked by a mechanic prior to purchase.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I understand how the deal works with used cars, so that is the second reason I won't take it back. I'm not afraid of the work or anything, I actually enjoy it. I only asked because as I previously stated I don't have much experience with drum brakes. I would have had it checked out by a mechanic but I was in a time crunch when I purchased it.
 

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With close to 60,000 miles, you might have worn shoes. It would be a good idea to check the brakes, front and rear, for wear. Of course, you will have to remove the drums to check the rear brakes and that should be a relatively easy task. We don't salt the roads here, so if the truck has been in Florida all of its life there should be minimal rust. You don't have to remove the shoes to accomplish what I posted above regarding the lube.
The only way to increase your experience level, with anything, is to do the work yourself. It is also a good way to learn about the workings of your truck. One thing that you will never be able to get enough of, is information. If the budget is slim, at least purchase a Haynes or Chilton manual. If you can swing the $28, a subscription at alldatadiy.com will get you all of the GM Service Manual information plus the Service Bulletins. You can always post any questions here, where the experience base is awesome. Let us know what you find.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you for the information on getting the service bulletins. I have checked the front brakes and it appears someone had replaced the pads recently due to minimal wear on them. I did remove then and added brake quiet lubricant to the backs of them just to ensure they weren't my problem. I think today or tomorrow I will have to check the rear and see what I can find. I may end up posting pics asking more information. I agree with doing the work myself and learning.
 

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You may be surprised how long the front pad last. I bet they are original! Many owners don't have to change front pads until 100,000+. GM has something figured out there! Mine need replaced anytime, I have 71,000. I haven't not checked for balance betweel left/right, but my left pad was on the squeaker over a month ago. I don't think the caliper returns properly, or something because it seems to have premature wear. Dealer cost for OEM, $174. I will NOT be putting GM pads back on since I don't intend to keep the vehicle for another 70,000 miles.

IF you find yourself doing a rear brake job on the truck, rent the special tool for the drums. You can do it without but it almost takes another hand. The took can do just that. If you are just doing to lube the contact points, no special tools needed.
My drums had a bunch of hard spots in them so I replaced them. It looked like there were rivets welded around the braking surface then ground down to match the surface. They were discolored from the heat too, on those spots.

And to be clear, I wasn't implying having somebody do the work. The mechanic inspection (pre purchase) could show results of upcoming repairs so you would be aware what you were getting involved with.

This drum setup is actually pretty simple. Just takes the extra hand to hold everything in place during assembly. Of course, do one side at a time so you have a reference.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you for all the advice! I didn't have to replace the shoes just needed some cleaning up and lubricant. I took out for a test drive afterword and no noise. I will definitely make sure to check them on a regular basis from now on.
 
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