Chevrolet Colorado & GMC Canyon Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone covered up the chrome on the front and rear bumper, and the grille bar? I am looking to get rid of the chrome in exchange for a glossy black.

I have used plastidip on previous vehicles and was not a huge fan, the finish is eh in my opinion and dirt sticks to it, so I'm not really trying to use that even though it is the easiest method probably.

I have considerd vinyl wrapping it. I have never personally wrapped anything so idk if I would do it myself or get someone to do it. Vinyl seems to not be too expensive so if I did do it myself it seems that it would be pretty cheap. No idea how much it would cost to do it professionally or where I'd even go for that.

Last option I guess would be painting it myself? Just painting it black then when it's done hitting it with come clear coat.

These were the only real options I could think of. Really just looking to see if anyone has tried any of these and if they turned out well or not. Also looking for any other suggestions if anyone can think of any.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
If you don’t want plastidip or bedliner don’t bother painting yourself. Chrome is a bitch and it will chip. You might as well get it done by a pro and bring it back if it chips


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
617 Posts
Get a primed replacement bumper and have it painted or bedlined. Nothing will adhere to the chrome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
and it is legit chrome, even the stuff on the plastic grille. it's all good quality electroplated shite. looks good for a long time, then when it deteriorates, it goes fast. It just doesn't take to modification very well. scuffing for paint will most likely end up with you attempting to peel the rest of the chrome to no avail.

Others have managed to scuff and paint the stuff on the chrome plated plastic, even me (albeit I sacrificed my first attempt as a learning piece) however results are not the best and paint adherence isn't great. stripping my piece to plastic and using an adhesion promoter worked better.

I basically depends if you want a DIY look that will last a while if you don't drive, or a seamless look that will actually stand up to weather and road conditions. I'm with the others suggesting a replacement primed bumper instead of a replacement chrome bumper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
897 Posts
Here is a trick to get paint to stick to chrome and YES it works. Use KILTZ the stain blocker primer. It even makes paint stick to glass
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
I'll have to see if I can get my hands on some of that KILZ stuff. I'm always up for an experiment or two, But KILZ isn't one that is readily available around here. I've used all kinds of primers and adhesion promoters with varying levels of success on different projects. not my first rodeo with rattle cans. I can appreciate that it is Hi Hide paint, but all that means is that it takes less paint to hide the under surface better, just like changing colors in your house.

Going over chrome one would assume its a decent idea to use Hi Hide, and if it bonds as well as your experience, then hell, it's worth a shot. The only thing I would suggest being careful with is your actual paint selections. Generally you cannot mix brands because one may be a lacquer and one an acrylic, or even different cure rates. lacquer wont adhere to acrylic, and lacquer needs much more curing time. If primer and paint doesn't cure properly before clear coat, the moisture will stay trapped under the clear, leaving you with soft paint. I suggest acrylics, as the cure time is fast and easy to avoid runs, plus it chemical bonds with other acrylics very well (within re-coating window) and even allows offgassing for curing through subsequent layers. I'ts just easier to use, and between primer, paint and clear, I can usually get it done in an hour and a half (30 min dry time on my paints, 24 hr cure)

If you let a layer of acrylic paint dry completely (beyond the re-coat window) it only takes minor scuffing to promote adhesion of the next layer, either a scotchbrite pad or 800-1000 grit (after 1000 grit, surfaces get too smooth and lose adhesion, as you are starting to polish). However I usually suggest aiming for a chemical bond between paint and clear, rather than scuffing for a physical bond, just start clear coat at the very end of the re-coat window of the last layer of color to achieve a good chemical bond without bleeding the color into the clear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
One other thing to note about paint curing times; they are generally based off of room temperature and HUMIDITY (very influential) around 60-80%relative humidity depending on the paint manufacturer

for example painting outdoors on a nice day, you will be hot and dry probably, so check your weather, and adjust your re-coat window a bit. It's not the end of the world, but low humidity will dry faster shrinking your re-coat window, and high humidity will increase your re-coat window slightly however extends dry and cure times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
There is a big trick that I learned years ago when building plastic model cars as a kid. Chrome plating can be removed from plastic by soaking it in ammonia. I have not tried it on our grill, but the process for adhering chrome to plastic is the same.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top