Chevrolet Colorado & GMC Canyon Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I had the Suspension Maxx bumpstops for a while but decided to take them off. The downside to that however is now that whenever my suspension unloads, the upper a arm hits the bumpstop bracket. I am would like to know if there is any bumpstop that would work the same as the SMAXX one but that might be maybe half the thickness. I wasn't a fan of how often the truck was hitting the SMAXX ones which was why I took them off.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,710 Posts
I think I hit my bumpstops too. I thought about cutting them down on an angle or doing something that allows a bit more travel.

I am not aware of any other spacers available.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,266 Posts
That stop that you are hitting was being hit when your truck was new. It has never had a rubber stop from the factory. Go jack up an uncranked truck with out the upper bump stop and that metal flat piece will be where the suspension rests at no load. You would have to get your truck airborn for it to every hit it when driving. I just never put them on.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,710 Posts
So wait...you are saying that stock, the UCA rests on the tower?

When the vehicle is lifted by torsion bars, the angle of the UCA is modified and becomes close in proximity to the tower thingy. When it's stock, the UCA is more 'level', if you will.
This is the reason why droop is reduced with torsion bar lifting -you are in a 'droop' position already at ride height (after the lift).

That's my understanding anyway.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,266 Posts
So wait...you are saying that stock, the UCA rests on the tower?

When the vehicle is lifted by torsion bars, the angle of the UCA is modified and becomes close in proximity to the tower thingy. When it's stock, the UCA is more 'level', if you will.
This is the reason why droop is reduced with torsion bar lifting -you are in a 'droop' position already at ride height (after the lift).

That's my understanding anyway.
Absolutely. A torsion bar lift, whether cranked or reindexed keys, is in a state of droop at lift. The travel limits do not change with a "crank" lift. When a stock truck is at full droop, the uca rests on the tower. If I jack up my "cranked" truck to where the tire is off the ground it still rests on the tower. The only difference from a stock truck vs t bar, "crank", lifted truck is that the amount of travel to full droop is less than that of a stock truck, Also in contrast, the distance to full compression on the "crank" truck, is much greater.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,710 Posts
Agreed limits are not changed, but the available range is altered. However after cranking, aren't you essentially giving the truck a 'head start' to full droop, meaning that it will hit full droop quickly (when compared to stock)?

So in the case of the question above, doesn't that mean that the truck will experience a full droop condition sooner than it would have otherwise given the same amount of travel. I mean, if you hit a bump and the suspension should cycle lets say 3", you are really at the bottom end of the 3", instead of the mid-position if the vehicle were stock.

Not sure if I explained that correctly. Point being, if we hit a bump on a stock vehicle we won't really have metal collisions like we will if we hit the same bump after cranking. Because after cranking we have already put the vehicle into a droop condition.

Is that right, or make sense?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
I think what he's trying to say is, the angle of the dangle is proportional to the heat of the meat, well thats what i got out of it anyway?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
their are None available, but im guessing you could always modify the smaxx bump stops you have, no?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,266 Posts
Agreed limits are not changed, but the available range is altered. However after cranking, aren't you essentially giving the truck a 'head start' to full droop, meaning that it will hit full droop quickly (when compared to stock)?

So in the case of the question above, doesn't that mean that the truck will experience a full droop condition sooner than it would have otherwise given the same amount of travel. I mean, if you hit a bump and the suspension should cycle lets say 3", you are really at the bottom end of the 3", instead of the mid-position if the vehicle were stock.

Not sure if I explained that correctly. Point being, if we hit a bump on a stock vehicle we won't really have metal collisions like we will if we hit the same bump after cranking. Because after cranking we have already put the vehicle into a droop condition.

Is that right, or make sense?
I was agreeing with you. Your observations are correct. after a crank less downward travel to the downward limit. Full droop sooner.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,623 Posts
Never made contact with the "tower" while stock. But after a 2 inch TB crank and bump stops installed it made contact all the time which led to the crack you see near the UBJ mount. One of the reasons I went with a proper lift kit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,917 Posts
I see you have a nice collection of rocks lol
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,623 Posts
Yes I do. Most of them are still there today. Gives the truck a bit of character IMO.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,266 Posts
Never made contact with the "tower" while stock. But after a 2 inch TB crank and bump stops installed it made contact all the time which led to the crack you see near the UBJ mount. One of the reasons I went with a proper lift kit.
I never installed my rubber stops like these, at the suggestion of my friend who helped me install the keys and shackles. He showed me that the stop would impead my downward travel. So far no cracks like you got, and no other real issues. Hoping in the near future to do as you did and get a skyjacker or rancho lift.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,710 Posts
My stops don't look quite as bad as Greg's, but I do have marks on the surface. I should probably check my UCA for cracking.

I don't off road my truck. Ocassionally dirt roads while out mountain bike riding or dirt bike riding. Or sometimes I just get bored. But I don't hammer the truck in those situations. Most of my suspension articulation is from RR crossings, the deep curb and gutter systems between properly and traveled ways, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Like Greg, I also had a crack forming on my drivers side UCA which is what prompted me to remove that bump stop.

My goal here is to have a little something on that bumpstop tower so that when my front unloads (hitting a deep pothole, going over rough train tracks, or any other situation where it would unload suddenly) it doesnt sound or feel like there is something breaking (just the metal on metal striking). It doesn't happen often, but when it does, it pisses me off.

I was honestly thinking about using some flexi dip or something similar and just layering it a lot.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,266 Posts
Those stops are usually put at a location that is close the the travel limit of your upper balljoint. Either withing the joint itself, or the "cup," for lack of a better term, that the ball joint sits in will bottom out on the knuckle.

I have my truck turned far beyond what is usually "reccommended" and I trimmed the metal stop slightly. It did help some. You could also considering making a travel strap for the front end that would tighten out a 1/4" before hit the metal stop

I also agree with what was stated before. Your travel does not change with a torsion bar lift, you are skewing the travel ratio to more compression, and less rebound. Which often can be good in various offroad conditions. If you have, as easy round numbers, 6" of travel from the factory, it is often set so that 3" of that is compression, and 3" is rebound. If you index the torsion bars for 2" of lift, then you would now have 5" of compression travel and 1" of rebound travel.
I agree. Wish I could have said this like you did. Thanks!
 

·
I'm "That Guy"
Joined
·
1,185 Posts
Get some S&D tubed upper arms. Or any of their kits actually...they're great guys to deal with.

No more hitting the bump stop, and you'll gain more travel. Your next travel limit will be the steering after that, and then the CV's. There's options in the works for handling that too, but those are complete front suspension kits and won't be out for a while yet.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top