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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
In my other thread there's a discussion about my obvious broken freon line. http://www.355nation.net/forum/v8-engine-drivetrain/114769-design-flaw-our-ac-system.html

Got that fixed for $524.26. The guy at the shop mentioned that the drier needed to be replaced in the whole process. I thought nothing of it. It was fixed and the ac blew cold air and I was happy. 2 weeks later, I get the surprise of hot air through the vents. I looked for a leak and I couldn't find one. I just simply recharged the system with a can of freon and it took the whole can barely over the correct pressure. It took 3 days before it all leaked out and I'm driving in hot black truck for 3 weeks straight in triple digits. I checked the invoice and I find out that no drier or filter of any kind is replaced. I also find out that the compressor has a huge leak on the front of it.

This issue didn't exist before the repair so I believe that the lack of a filter or drier replacement slowly broke the compressor. I'm no expert so would anyone know if this is the cause? Is the shop responsible for this damage due to the lack of replacing the correct parts when they told me that they are?

At this point I'm going to fix this shit myself if they don't offer to fix it for free. I'll even buy the parts If they agree that they messed up the don't charge me for labor. I know that this is a long shot but it's worth the shot seeing that it costs over $1k to fix.

If I do fix this myself, what else do I need to buy besides the compressor and drier? Will the system need to be flushed? I read that the parallel condensers don't take a flush very well but I don't know. Can someone with more experience than me please chime in? These triple digits are killing me. Not only that, I work outside all day by myself and I use my truck for work.

Please and thank you.
 

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Seems like if it wasn't leaking before you had it repaired (if there is any way to prove it wasn't leaking), they are liable for it.

Do yourself a favor, accidentally leave out the part where you've been charging it yourself.
You need to take yourself out of the equation of having touched their work.

"I don't know man, it just started blowing cold air so I came back to you".

Works out better than - "After I left your shop, it eventually blew air and I started going behind you and charging my own system and I'm pretty sure I didn't do anything wrong to the work YOU performed".
 

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The problem is not the dryer per say even though it is a good idea to replace the dryer when the system is opened up. If it worked and you added freon and it cooled again then quit you have a leak. How did you check for the leak? You need a sniffer to check for leaks in the AC system especially small leaks. If you don't own or can borrow a detector you can also buy a can of freon that has a colored dye in it to show the leak too. AC parts are expensive so don't just throw money at the problem take the time to fix it right. You will be happier and maybe save some money too.
 

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There shouldn't be any contamination from a broken line, only from internal component failure. Sounds to me they didn't pull a vacuum. Oxygen and refrigerant combined makes acid. Then condensers and evaporators start rotting. Find shop #2 ,repair correctly, and hand shop #1 the bill and a business card from a lawyer.
 

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If the compressor didn't have an internal failure, you shouldn't need a flush. Replacing the drier might have been a good idea, but didn't contribute to the compressor leak. Realistically, it would be hard to "tie" the compressor leak to the replaced line. The shop should certainly have noticed a leak if they vacuumed the system. It would be a good idea to contact the shop and get their opinion and go from there. If you are going to replace the parts yourself, the standard procedure is to service the compressor and drier with a predetermined quantity of oil at the time of installation. Usually the quantity it indicated on the documentation that comes with the part. You can get the oil (specific to R134a systems) at most auto parts stores.

Just curious, the replaced line has a Dealer price of $81.27. Knowing that a shop is not going to be charged that much, just what was on the invoice that justified the approximate $450 remaining cost? I know freon is expensive, but not that expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
In the initial repair, they were supposed to check for any other leaks. At least that's what he told me. He stated that the leak was too small for them to detect with a sniffer or a black light. He didn't work on the truck so I'm sure he's making it up. He also said that they replaced a filter and not the drier. That's not on the invoice. I don't see any filter on the freon system diagram. So I'm led to believe that the system got contaminated. He also mentioned that they did a pressure test.

I don't know how it happened, I also noticed that the power steering fluid cap was loose and hanging there by the dipstick.
 

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I agree with cart7881 as that is the reason to use a detector is to find small leaks not visible. If they cant find it they are the wrong shop to use. Not sure if it is still made but there use to be freon with leak sealer sold. I've been retired for 5 years now so not sure if it is still sold.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just about all the freon sold at autozone has leak sealant. I've even tried the stop a leak made by ac pro. The leak keeps getting worse. Just spoke with someone that knows his shit and he's going to help me. Going to buy new compressor, drier and expansion valve and I'll open up the compressor and see if there's and metal floating around hoping that the condenser doesn't need a flush. This all will save me over 1000 in repairs. I just have to wait several days for the parts to arrive. The Mark up on these parts are double to what I can get online.
 

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Hey cool hope you get it fixed.
 

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Most of the time, leaks are in the filling niples.
What ^^ said .... Not on my Colorado, but a Ford F100 I had way back when...... after I replaced the air compressor, I started getting very annoying leaks all over. Had to use dye in the system to find them all.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I plan to replace all the seals when I do this work. I'm really tempted to replace the condenser too. Condensers now days get so clogged beyond flushing to clear them. The freon flows through holes about the size of needle.
 

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If your compressor is leaking somewhere other than at the line fittings, my guess is they sucked most of the pag oil out of the system when they vacuumed it. Then when recharging they didn't replace the oil in the system. Compressor was oil-starved and slowly went bad, resulting in your leak.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If your compressor is leaking somewhere other than at the line fittings, my guess is they sucked most of the pag oil out of the system when they vacuumed it. Then when recharging they didn't replace the oil in the system. Compressor was oil-starved and slowly went bad, resulting in your leak.
If this were the case, would this cause any metal shavings to float around in the ac system? I'm trying to figure out whether or not to replace the condenser. I guess I'll find out when I open up the system?
 

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You basically have an operational HVAC system that has a leak. I doubt that the compressor has "failed" and caused internal contamination of the system. I have recovered/vacuumed/serviced more than a few vehicles and have never experienced the vacuuming process removing oil from the HVAC system. If replacing the condenser would ease your mind, by all means, do it. I would suggest replacing the compressor and receiver/drier and finding a different shop to service the system. As mentioned earlier, replacing those components usually requires adding a predetermined amount of the proper oil. The information that comes with the component normally specifies what and how much to use. Some compressors comes pre-serviced.

One thing, not mentioned before, is that you are going to have to deal with the separate drive belt that the 5.3 has for the compressor. I'm not sure that the belt can be reused as the Service Manual removal instructions say to cut it. So you will probably need a new belt and the installation tool.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
You basically have an operational HVAC system that has a leak. I doubt that the compressor has "failed" and caused internal contamination of the system. I have recovered/vacuumed/serviced more than a few vehicles and have never experienced the vacuuming process removing oil from the HVAC system. If replacing the condenser would ease your mind, by all means, do it. I would suggest replacing the compressor and receiver/drier and finding a different shop to service the system. As mentioned earlier, replacing those components usually requires adding a predetermined amount of the proper oil. The information that comes with the component normally specifies what and how much to use. Some compressors comes pre-serviced.

One thing, not mentioned before, is that you are going to have to deal with the separate drive belt that the 5.3 has for the compressor. I'm not sure that the belt can be reused as the Service Manual removal instructions say to cut it. So you will probably need a new belt and the installation tool.
Thanks for the heads up on the belt. I was wondering how I take it off. I figured that I could unbolt the compressor and it should loosen it off. Haven't quite figured out how to put it on. Never thought of buyinga new one.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Fixed the ac finally. The compressor was a pita to replace. I used the old belt. Couldn't find the tool anywhere so I just got it as snug as possible on the crank and used a ratchet to turn the crank pully. The belt eased on there. Borrowed a Vacuum and a r134a manifold gauge from autozone. evacuate and recharged the system myself. Doing all the work myself saved me around $1,200.
 
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