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The plugs you mentioned are a preferred replacement but I haven't read much about which to stay away from, aside from the E2. I hear those are a waste (in these engines).

Honestly, I hear more good about the AC Delco's than most anything else. If I am not mistaken, the AC and NGK are the same plug. OR, it's NGK and something else that are the same....just different part number and banding.
 

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CHEEZEDOODLE
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I had to delete this photobucket and dont have the pics anymore....com crashed.

Sorry guise.
 

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I had a set of NGK TR55's installed when they put the cam in.
TR-6 is 1 step colder
TR-5 smaller gap than TR-55
 

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Spark Plug Replacement

Removal Procedure



  1. Remove the spark plug wire. Refer to Spark Plug Wire Replacement.
  2. Loosen the spark plug 1-2 turns.
  3. Brush or using compressed air, blow away any dirt from around the spark plug.
  4. Remove the spark plug.
  5. If removing more than one plug, place each plug in a tray marked with the corresponding cylinder number.


Installation Procedure
  1. Correctly position the spark plug washer.
  2. Inspect the spark plug gap. Adjust the gap as needed. Refer to Ignition System Specifications.
  3. Hand start the spark plug in the corresponding cylinder.
    Caution: Refer to Fastener Caution in the Preface section.
  4. Tighten the spark plug.
    Tighten
    Tighten the plug to 20 N·m (15 lb ft).
  5. Install the spark plug wire. Refer to Spark Plug Wire Replacement.
 

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Spark Plug Wire Replacement

Removal Procedure

  1. Remove the spark plug wire from the spark plug.
    • Twist each spark plug 1/2 turn.
    • Pull only on the boot in order to remove the wire from each spark plug.
  2. Remove the spark plug wire from the ignition coil.
    • Twist each spark plug boot 1/2 turn.
    • Pull only on the boot in order to remove the wires from the ignition coil.


Installation Procedure
  1. Install the spark plug wire to the ignition coil.
  2. Install the spark plug wire to the spark plug.
  3. Inspect the wires for proper installation:
    • Push sideways on each boot in order to inspect the seating.
    • Reinstall any loose boot.
 

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Spark Plug Inspection


  • Verify that the correct spark plug is installed. An incorrect spark plug causes driveability conditions.
  • Ensure that the spark plug has the correct heat range. An incorrect heat range causes the following conditions:
    - Spark plug fouling - Colder plug
    - Pre-ignition causing spark plug and/or engine damage - Hotter plug
  • Inspect the terminal post (1) for damage.
    - Inspect for a bent or broken terminal post (1)
    - Test for a loose terminal post (1) by twisting and pulling the post. The terminal post should not move.
  • Inspect the insulator (2) for flashover or carbon tracking, or soot. This is caused by the
    electrical charge traveling across the insulator between the terminal post (1) and ground.

    Inspect for the following conditions:
    - Inspect the spark plug boot for damage.
    - Inspect the spark plug recess are of the cylinder head for moisture, such as oil, coolant, or water. A spark plug boot that is saturated will cause arcing to ground.
  • Inspect the insulator (2) for cracks. All or part of the electrical charge may arc through the crack instead of the electrodes (3,4).
  • Inspect for evidence of improper arcing.
    - Measure the gap between the center electrode (4) and the side electrode (3). Refer to Ignition System Specifications. An excessively wide electrode gap can prevent correct spark plug operation.
    - Inspect for the correct spark plug torque. Refer to Ignition System Specifications. Insufficient
    torque can prevent correct spark plug operation. An over torqued spark plug, causes the
    insulator (2) to crack.
    - Inspect for signs of tracking that occurred near the insulator tip instead of the center electrode (4).
    - Inspect for a broken or worn side electrode (3).
    - Inspect for a broken, worn, or loose center electrode (4) by shaking the spark plug.
  • A rattling sound indicates internal damage.
  • A looses center electrode (4) reduces the spark intensity.
    - Inspect for bridged electrodes (3,4). Deposits on the electrodes (3,4) reduce or eliminates the gap.
    - Inspect for worn or missing platinum pads on the electrodes (3,4), if equipped.
    - Inspect for excessive fouling.
  • Inspect the spark plug recess area of the cylinder head for debris. Dirty or damaged threads can cause the spark plug not to seat correctly during installation.

Visual Inspection
  • Normal operation - Brown to grayish-tan with small amounts of white powdery deposits are normal combustion by-products from fuels with additives.
  • Carbon fouled - Dry, fluffy black carbon, or soot caused by the following conditions:
    - Rich fuel mixtures
  • Leaking fuel injectors
  • Excessive fuel pressure
  • Restricted air filter element
  • Incorrect combustion
    - Reduced ignition system voltage output
  • Weak ignition coils
  • Worn ignition wires
  • Incorrect spark plug gap
    - Excessive idling or slow speeds under light loads can keep spark plug temperatures so low that normal combustion deposits may not burn off.
  • Deposit fouling - Oil, coolant, or additives that include substances such as silicone, very white coating, reduces the spark plug intensity. Most powdery deposits will not affect spark plug intensity unless they form into a glazing over the electrode.
 

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The spark plug has an Iridium tip. The spark plug, P/N 12609877 with AC Delco P/N 41-985, is gapped to 1.01mm (0.040 inches) when the spark plug is made. The spark plug gap is set during manufacturing and should not be changed or damage to the spark plug may result. Any new spark plug found to not be properly gapped should not be used.
 

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US Army 19yrs and ......
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Cylinders 7 & 8 are both a pain in the dick.....but the right combo of socket and extensions gets it done
 

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AC DELCO #41-110 Iridium (This plug replaces the 41-985)
AC DELCO #41-985 Iridium


Denso Iridium Long-Life #5090


NGK Iridium IX #TR5IX
NGK V-Power #TR5
NGK G-Power #TR5GP
NGK OE Laser Iridium #IZTR5B11


Bosch Platinum Ir Fusion #4509
Bosch Platinum+4 #4469
Bosch Platinum+2 #4309
Bosch Platinum Plus #4013
Bosch Super Plus #7982
Bosch OE Fine Wire Double Platinum #8104
Bosch OE Fine Wire Iridium #9602
Bosch OE Fine Wire Platinum #6704


Champion Iridium #9405
Champion Copper Plus #408
 

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This is on my list of things to do. Now that its getting colder out it will probably wait until spring like everything else

got some NGK TR55 plugs and MSD 8.5mm wires
 

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Took me every bit of 4 hours with breaks. Driver front was the most difficult to get to. I went through the wheel well and removed the plastic wheel well liner for easier access. Don't noticmuch of a difference yet. Maybe smoother idle. Gas mileage will be the real proof in the pudding. Still need to clean my TB and MAF. Then get ready to let James know I'm ready for a tune.
 

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I took the plastic wheel well deals off and found it rather easy to access them from the wheel wells. This is after I broke the farthest back plug on each side while trying to remove it from above.
 

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Back in the day (when you changed plugs every spring) I had a V8 Chevy MONZA. After a few years (and a couple of specially bent wrenches) I could get them changed out in about 3 hours. Had to use AC plugs (a little shorted than the others) so the spark from #3 would not blow through the boot grounding out to the steering post. Manual called for jacking the engine! Fun stuff !
 
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