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The community here at 355nation.net urges you to please use caution and seek professional assistance when performing modifications to your vehicle. Before attempting any modification it is advised that you refer to your Colorado or Canyon service manual or contact a certified mechanic as not all GMT355 trucks are the same. The staff and the associated members are in no way responsible for any damages, injuries or other harm inflicted to your vehicle or yourself which may result in attempting these modifications. The posts and content presented on this site reflect in no way the views of 355nation.net or it’s ownership.




A 355nation How To presented by

Supermodulation

Project Name
SuperMods Sound System and BIG 3 Electrical Upgrades

Project Description
Supermodulation Stereo System that includes the BIG 3 electrical system upgrades, Heavy Duty Alternator, Heavy Duty wire and 3 Deep Cycle Batteries.

Electrical upgrades
200 Amp Alternator
3 X Exide Orbital (BlueTop) Deep Cycle Batteries.
4 gauge wire

Stereo System
Pioneer AVIC D3X HU.
Rockford Fosgate 3SIXTY.2 Interactive Signal Processor.
Pioneer Sirius Radio.
Pioneer Blue Tooth.
Alpine, Sub Mono Amp MRP-M650.
Alpine, 4 channel MRP-F450.
Alpine Front Door Speakers SPR-17S.
Alpine Rear Door Speakers SPS-17C2
Bolted together 2 Q-Logic QLH-.6510DS subwoofer enclosures.
2 x 10 inch Alpine Subwoofers, Model SWR-1042D DVC
GM Factory Integration Adapter

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Pioneer AVIC D3X head unit.







Sub Box





Stereo System Controller, fuse block, 2 aux deep cycle batteries, Isolation relay, power relay, RAP relay, Ground block, LED modulator, Speaker terminal strip, line filter for DSP, Main Power ON/OFF, RAP ON/OFF, Isolation Power ON/OFF switches and capacitor bleed down circuit.











2 x 10 inch Alpine Subwoofers, Model SWR-1042D DVC



=====================================================================================================================

Modulating CANYON LED logo.

http://s158.photobucket.com/albums/...stem/LED_SUBBOX/th_Modulating_Canyon_Logo.jpg

http://s158.photobucket.com/albums/...ction=view&current=Modulating_Canyon_Logo.mp4

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BIG 3 ELECTRICAL UPGRADES
a. Alternator
b. Battery
c. Wiring

=====================================================================================================================

ALTERNATOR:

Stock Alternator amperage rating for the Chevy Colorado and GMC Canyon trucks.
2004 to 2006, 100 amps
2007 to 2008, 125 amps

Aftermarket:
200 amp alternator installation
ALTERSTART Home Page

Alternator Data






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BATTERY:


HELPFUL TIP: Replace those POS factory battery cable ends!

3 X Exide Orbital Deep Cycle Batteries.





=========================================================================================

WIRING:

HELPFUL TIP, Apply an anti-oxidant lube on all connections to prevent corrosion.

Alternator (+) Positive 4 ga. out put wire to 200 AMP MEGA fuse, (length 2ft., 3/16" to 3/16"eyelets) . This wire will be connected in parallel with the factory harness.



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3 point grounding harness.
Engine block to frame, 2 ft. - 4 ga. wire with 3/8" to 1/2" connectors.
Engine block to chassis, 3 ft. - 4 ga. wire with 3/8" to 5/16" connectors.
Engine block to battery (-), 4 ft. - 4 ga. wire with 3/8" to 3/8" connectors.



The engine block makes an excellent common grounding point for the 3 point grounding harness.
Engine Grounding bolt is located behind the driver side wheel well.



Frame Ground, location: Driver side brake line bracket.



Engine Block to Battery Ground.



Engine Block to Chassis Ground.



==========================================================================================

BIG 3 Questions and Answers:


Article courtesy of the12volt.com

Performing a "Big 3" upgrade on your vehicle is one way to improve the electrical system performance and its ability to supply power to your audio system. This upgrade will help any vehicle using an after-market amplified stereo system, and most certainly should be performed on any vehicle after a high-output alternator is installed.
Please be sure you read and understand this entire instruction before you begin.
Definition: the "Big Three" upgrade means improving the current capacity of three cables:
1) alternator positive to battery positive,
2) battery negative to chassis, and
3) engine ground to chassis. Some people replace the factory wiring; others add additional cables to the factory wiring. This instruction is to add cables to existing OEM wiring.

Parts and Tools:
As a minimum, you will need to purchase the following:
• Sufficient length of high-strand count high capacity power cable.
- The length required differs for every vehicle. You can measure the length of the existing cables and buy the same length, or contact your dealer or a mechanic and ask, or sometimes you can look it up in a manufacturer's wiring book, or guess. If you guess, make sure you over-estimate and buy too much.
- High strand count cable is more flexible and more reliable than low-strand count cable. Never use solid-core wire in a moving vehicle as it will eventually break.
- The gauge of wire you need depends on the total current draw of your audio system, and/or the current generating capacity of your alternator. Never use smaller cable that you used to power your amps; never use smaller cable than what already exists in your vehicle; never use smaller cable than the generating capacity of your alternator; never use smaller than 4 AWG (it's just not worth the time to use anything smaller); if in doubt, always use higher gauge cable than you think you need. If you look at the Power and Ground charts and your amplifier current draw corresponds to 2 AWG cable, use no smaller than 2 AWG cable, and use 1/0 if you can.
• 6 ring terminals or lugs of the appropriate size for the cable chosen. Two of these need to be large enough to fit over your battery posts, or appropriately sized to bolt onto your existing battery terminals.
• 1/2" or 5/8" shrink tubing (or some other form of permanent electrical insulation. Tape is NOT recommended.)
• Cable ties (plastic zip ties.)
• Wire cutters large enough to handle the cable you choose.
• Crimper's large enough to handle the connectors you choose.
• Soldering iron or gun.
• Solder.
• Scotch Britte and/or a small wire brush.
• Heat gun.
• Safety razor blade (or other tool for stripping cable).
• Heat gun (if using shrink tubing).
• Wrenches for removing bolts in your vehicle.

Procedure:
1. Make sure your engine is completely cool before beginning. Identify the three cables being replaced. Make sure you can reach both ends of all cables. NOTE: the engine block to chassis cable may be between the engine and the transmission, or connected to the transmission and the fire wall, and is often an un-insulated flat braid cable.
2. Determine the lengths of cable needed to reach between the three locations being upgraded. Be sure you measure with a flexible tape (a tape measure used for sewing works great) and record the total length along the path you intend to install the cable. You do not want your cables to be pulled tight between any two locations as things move and vibrate as you drive. Be sure to include at least 1 inch extra for slack. NOTE: there is no reason to copy the existing wiring layout in your vehicle unless you want to. Also, be sure that the path you choose does not follow or lay across anything that gets hot, like exhaust parts, or anything that must move, like throttle linkage.
3. Cut your new cable to the three proper lengths. NOTE: some people like to use red cable for positive and black cable for negative. Doing this is completely up to you and is nice, but not necessary. You can use cable with any color insulation you like.
4. Strip each end of all cables to the proper length for the terminal lugs being used. NOTE: after full insertion into the lug, a small "band" of bare wire is usually seen between the back of the lug and the beginning of the cable insulation.
5. Begin at any one end and insert the stripped cable into the lug. Make sure it is fully inserted. Crimp the connector to hold the wire in place. NOTE: crimping large cable can be difficult. The intention here is not to make the crimp the sole means of holding the wire, but only to make sure the lug does not slip around during the soldering phase. I do NOT recommend using hammers or pliers or vices to crimp the connector as over-crimping can break the strands of the cable, reducing the current carrying capacity. Do not over-crimp.
6. You may need to use a vise or some other set of "helping hands" to hold the cable while you solder it. Heat your soldering iron and place it on the connector (on the lug side) barrel. Hold a piece of solder against the tip of the iron and melt the solder into the strands of the cable. Use sufficient solder to fill the connector and completely cover all strands of the cable. NOTE: the lug will get hot and will burn you if you try to hold it. Also, if the insulation on the cable starts to melt, you are over-heating the cable and not paying attention to melting the solder into the cable. You do not need to try and melt the cable!
7. Repeat the above steps on each end of all three cables.
8. After the cables have completely cooled, cut a piece of shrink tubing long enough to cover the soldered barrel end of the lugs and reach about 1/2" onto the insulation of each cable end. Slide this over each lug and use a heat gun to recover the tubing in place.
9. Disconnect your battery, starting with the negative cable first then the positive cable. Discharge any caps you may have in the system.
10. Begin adding your new cables along side the existing ones. I usually begin with the alternator positive cable. Locate the output stud on your alternator and remove the nut. Slip the new cable onto the lug and replace the nut. There is no need to disturb the existing cabling. Route the new cable to the battery and position it to connect to the positive battery post (or connect it to the positive terminal on the OEM wiring) but do not connect the battery yet.
11. Secure the new cable in place by using cable ties every 6 to 8 inches. Secure the cable to cool non-moving parts!
12. Locate where the negative battery cable attaches to the vehicle chassis. Remove this bolt and the OEM battery cable, and clean the mounting area of the chassis using scotch brite and/or a wire brush. Make sure there is no dirt, rust, paint, undercoating, etc in this location. You want bright shiny metal. Connect both your new ground and the OEM ground back to the chassis. NOTE: Some people like to create a new ground location by drilling into the chassis and using a bolt with star lock washers for the new ground cable. Route this new cable back to the battery and position it to be attached, or connect it to the negative terminal. Do not reconnect the battery yet.
13. Secure the negative cable using cable ties every 6-8 inches. Again, don't tie it to anything that moves or that gets hot!
14. Disconnect the engine ground strap at both ends. Using the wire brush or scotch brite, clean both the engine block and the chassis as you did for the first ground strap.
15. Line up the lugs on both the OEM ground strap and your new ground cable, and use cable ties to secure them to each other. This is much easier to accomplish in your lap or on the floor than it is while lying under your car or hanging upside down in the engine compartment. Reinstall both cables at the same time using the factory bolts.
16. Double check to make sure all bolts are tight. Be careful not to over-tighten them as you don't want to strip anything! Also, on some factory alternators it is WAY too easy to twist off the positive output lug. If you break it off, well hell, you really wanted a high-output alternator anyway, right? It is also a good idea at this point to measure resistance of the new cables. Take an ohm reading between the battery end of the new ground cable and the engine block. It should read less than one ohm. Also check between the alternator bolt and the disconnected positive battery terminal, which should also be less than one ohm. If you read too high resistance, double check all connections and make sure you do not have something c**cocked sideways or hanging loose.

NOTE: Realize that the "absolute ground" of the electrical system is not the battery negative terminal or the vehicle chassis, but is the case of the alternator itself. This is why perhaps the most important cable among the Big 3 is the engine ground strap, as this is what connects the alternator ground to the vehicle's chassis. Be certain the resistance between the alternator case (the engine block assuming the alternator is properly bolted to the engine) and the battery negative is minimized. (Thanks to the12volt for pointing this out!)
17. When you are sure you are done and anything in your system that you may have disconnected are re-connected, clean your battery posts and reconnect the positive battery terminal first, then the negative one.
18. Start your vehicle. Hopefully the engine starts. :) Examine the engine compartment and make sure none of your cables are getting hot or are vibrating or shaking around. If they are vibrating too much you may need to relocate them or use more cable ties. If you see smoke, immediately shut off the car and disconnect the battery. Seek help. :)
19. Assuming all looks good, take a voltage reading at your amplifier and ensure you read 13.8 (or higher) volts. This indicates a properly operating charging system.
20. Now be a good time to turn it on and make sure it sounds good! Then of course log onto the12volt.com and post that you have upgraded your Big 3!


===================================================================================================================================

The final test. Sound level meter. 123.8 dB, Clean and crisp sound at full volume!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
hey man thanks for this i will be doing the big 3 upgrade soon. that 123.8 aint bad. My colly was pushin 145 on my last build... ;)
Glad to see my write-up will be helpful to you!

Anyone can make loud sounds. Mine is crisp and clear sounding at FULL volume.
Just perfect for block parties!

Ask anyone who went to the 2009 NESM!

[URL=http://s158.photobucket.com/albums/t99/wqan531/NEC355/2009NESM/Movies/?action=view&current=ParkSupermodStereo1.mp4][/URL]

[URL=http://s158.photobucket.com/albums/t99/wqan531/NEC355/2009NESM/Movies/?action=view&current=ParkSupermodStereo2.mp4][/URL]

[URL=http://s158.photobucket.com/albums/t99/wqan531/NEC355/2009NESM/Movies/?action=view&current=ParkSupermodStereo3.mp4][/URL]
 

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I was there Jame!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Nice write up James. Very helpful tips. Did you get a different heard unit? It's just that the one posted with the 123.8 reading is different from the one at the top.
 

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seriously clean install. your work always impresses me man. really makes me want to put that second amp back in my truck just for the couple months before i sell it lol. amped speakers are something you cant have then not, life gets dull fast haha
 

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Did you run new wires into the front doors? I am having trouble figuring this out. I tried to use the factory grommit but can't get the plugs out. Would it be easier to just drill new holes in the door and use my own grommit and wire loom?
 

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for door speakers i just tapped into them behind the dash...makes it easy to run all the speakers to your amp in one easy location. i'm sure many will disagree but the stock wiring to the speakers is perfectly fine to use. plus makes installation 1000x easier.
 

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Might be a stupid question, but I'm confused about the connection with the cable running from the alternator (+) to the mega fuse... my mega fuse is only 100 amp... Do I upgrade that to 200 amp, or am I misunderstanding something?
 

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holy fuckin nice write up (i know its a review but damn near a write on the big 3)

i was at NESM 09 and his system is LOUD but more importantly clean. def impressed me for being a couple of 10's.
 

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i think this is the first time i've seen someone use a marine deep cycle battery as an automotive starting battery. wasn't aware you could do that.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
i think this is the first time i've seen someone use a marine deep cycle battery as an automotive starting battery. wasn't aware you could do that.

The deep cycle battery's offer longer reserve capacity and better line filtering.
After 5 years of trouble free service I replaced my primary battery with an EXIDE Nascar Extreme.

New Design Batteries: Exide Nascar Extreme
Heavy Duty Replacement for the GMT355: Model 34-E108

Links: Transportation NA
 

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R.I.P. Joe!
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The deep cycle battery's offer longer reserve capacity and better line filtering.
After 5 years of trouble free service I replaced my primary battery with an EXIDE Nascar Extreme.

New Design Batteries: Exide Nascar Extreme
Heavy Duty Replacement for the GMT355: Model 34-E108

Links: Transportation NA
I want to get one of those batteries for my 07 some time before the fall season this year is over. :thumbup:



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

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ok guys so whats the trick to getting that damn engine ground bolt out?
 

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ok guys so whats the trick to getting that damn engine ground bolt out?

Jack up the driver side of your truck and remove the wheel and fender cap guard.



Use a foot long 3/8" extension. I believe the bolt is a 15mm


 

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i did all that just dont have the 12" extension... gave it all i had with a 6 incher tho lol... im goin to get another one tomorrow. is the bolt locktited in? and thanks for the extensive write-up on this!
 

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i did all that just dont have the 12" extension... gave it all i had with a 6 incher tho lol... im goin to get another one tomorrow. is the bolt locktited in? and thanks for the extensive write-up on this!
I don't believe so. Just a bastard to get to.:shrug:
 
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