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I was going some searching to see if anyone made an aluminum radiator for our 355s and came across this on H4O Home. Its a direct bolt in radiator for the H3 so I would assume it is a direct bolt in for us as well. The page where I found it said it isn't on the Ron Davis Radiator web site and that you have to call to order it but I'm gonna call them tomorrow to see how much it is.
 

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That would be awesome !! Nice find... If it turns out to be fact !!
 

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Just going by the pic above, that all metal rad only has 55 tubes. The stock rad I removed had 62 tubes spaced 3/8" and 15 fins/inch. The replacement rad from AutoZone (Spectra Premium) has 67 tubes spaced 5/16" and 18 fins/inch. The core is 1" thick. I'm thinking more tubes spaced closer together with more fins/inch equals better performance.

New rad/old rad side by side comparison and new rad.
 

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Just going by the pic, that all metal rad has 55 tubes. The stock rad I removed had 62 tubes spaced 3/8" and 15 fins/inch. The replacement rad from AutoZone (Spectra Premium) has 67 tubes spaced 5/16" and 18 fins/inch. I'm thinking more tubes spaced closer together with more fins/inch equals better performance.

New rad/old rad side by side comparison and new rad.
Makes sense...

Or, aluminum is an advantage in heat dissipation.
But enough to outweigh the difference in number tubes? Hmm.

For me, quality of construction and overall reliability would matter also.
(reliability in this case meaning resistance to leaks)

How does that compare to the OE 8-cylinder radiator??
 

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Makes sense...

Or, aluminum is an advantage in heat dissipation.
But enough to outweigh the difference in number tubes? Hmm.

For me, quality of construction and overall reliability would matter also.
(reliability in this case meaning resistance to leaks)

How does that compare to the OE 8-cylinder radiator??
The core, not the tanks, is the business end of a rad regarding heat dissipation.....but aluminum tanks do look nice. I also like the lifetime warranty that came with the replacement rad. The top O-ring on my OE rad decided to let go....the tanks and core were fine.
 

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Hey 383, what's the pt # on that rad from Auto zone ? I5 or V8 ?
 

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V8 part # is CU2855. About $450, iirc.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Just going by the pic above, that all metal rad only has 55 tubes. The stock rad I removed had 62 tubes spaced 3/8" and 15 fins/inch. The replacement rad from AutoZone (Spectra Premium) has 67 tubes spaced 5/16" and 18 fins/inch. The core is 1" thick. I'm thinking more tubes spaced closer together with more fins/inch equals better performance.

New rad/old rad side by side comparison and new rad.
I always thought they dropped the number of tubes so that they could increase the size of the tubes themselves to add more coolant flow and have more area in between them to get added air flow through the radiator to the larger tubes. I could be way off but I always thought that was the other reason for buying an aftermarket radiator aside from the aluminum helping with heat dissipation.
 

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Years ago I had a92 s10 reg cab with a 355 HP crate 350(what a dog) and tried every aftermarket rad. Available with very poor results and paid Like $90.00 for an 88 vette rad. That fit. Perfect and cooled much better than be cool,Davis,and a few others. I did have good luck with Dewitt in my blown C5.this place is kind of the ultimate rad. Test but I still like the factory ones if I can make them fit!
 

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I always thought they dropped the number of tubes so that they could increase the size of the tubes themselves to add more coolant flow and have more area in between them to get added air flow through the radiator to the larger tubes. I could be way off but I always thought that was the other reason for buying an aftermarket radiator aside from the aluminum helping with heat dissipation.
The stock OE rad I removed was a 1 row, 1" thick core with 62 coolant tubes. The aftermarket OE style replacement rad I installed is a 1 row 1" thick core with 67 coolant tubes. Since each tube is the same size, having more tubes (67 vs 62) means more coolant in and flowing thru the core. More metal surface area means more heat being extracted from the coolant. Modern rad design over the past 20+ years has gone to less number of rows but much wider tubes, ie. 1 row of 1" wide tubes with a higher fin/inch count (modern) vs 2 rows of 1/2" wide tubes and less fin/inch count (old school).

It would be interesting to know more about that Ron Davis rad. We already know it has less tubes but how wide are the tubes, how thick is the core, how many rows and what is the fins/inch count??????? Basically all we do know is, it has less rows, it's expensive, and it's pretty. Devil's in the details, regarding efficiency.
 

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That sounds like a cooling system that's not 100%.......weak fan clutch, sticky stat, dirty/clogged coolant passages in the rad/motor, bad/slipping impeller on water pump, etc.
 

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That sounds like a cooling system that's not 100%.......weak fan clutch, sticky stat, dirty/clogged coolant passages in the rad/motor, bad/slipping impeller on water pump, etc.
Everything is fine. It's a combination ofa black truck, direct sunlight, no wind, 100° and truck on for an hour with the AC on. Never overheated.
 
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