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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Have finally started the SAS for real and there's no turning back now, as you'll see in the pics.


All jacked up and no place to go.


Dually? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nah.


Rear Dana 44 from '69 Jeep Gladiator (Narrowed for 65" WMS-WMS).


Front Dana 44 from '77 K10.


Front Dana 44 shortened for 65" WMS-WMS. Will be Hi-Steer, but no pics yet.


Frame slicked. Crossmember will be removed and replaced later, after Trail Gear spring mounts are installed.



Suspension goodies from Trail Gear. Oh, and my cool welding/cutting table I built (and matching welding/cutting cart). :D


5.13s, etc. Ox Lockers front and rear on the way.


Pitbull Rockers 35x12.50-15


Yukon 4340 front Shafts


The carnage. If anybody wants any of this stuff, let me know. The boxes have the OEM steering knuckles in them.


Also selling the Rancho Lift, complete with shocks ($600 + shipping), and Skyjacker Rear Springs ($250 + shipping). Later, will be selling the body lift but need to keep it in place for now so it's easier to work. :) Will also be selling a lot of OEM parts (bumpers, radiator, shroud, trans lines, hitch, spare tire winch, tow hooks, H3 tow shackles, etc, etc, but haven't even catalogued it all yet to know what I have. :lol:

I'll continue posting the progress as I go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Looks good! Also you still have the front drive shaft? Do not see it in the pic of removed parts.
Do still have the front DS but not sure I'm ready to sell it yet.

Nice progress, waiting to see your steering setup. are you gonna run a yota box?
Not running the Yota box. Had one sourced but is going to be too big to work with the Flex-a-lite aluminum radiator I installed about a year ago. lower outlet is on left and right in the way. So . . . planning on using a Jeep J10 box because they mount inside the frame rail, but low so it won't interfere with the tire clearance or the radiator either. At least that's the plan for now. We'll see how that goes when I actually get the J10 box in hand. Have to sell some stuff first though. :D

don't use the oem front driveshaft though whatever you do dirtydawg
Yeah, that CV is pretty weak looking. Plus, I think it's gonna hit the tranny crossmember really bad when it flexes. Am hoping to cure that with a REAL CV joint shaft - maybe out of a GM 1 ton or something. May end up being totally custom though. We've got a good drive shaft shop about a mile from my house but they're pricey so I'd rather modify than go the custom route.
 

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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Definitely the way to start a build thread, with the truck on stands and most of your parts already in hand; way more believable lol.

Good luck and enjoy yourself.
Thanks Freewood. I love the build and I love using it. So I think this is gonna be loads of fun.

Haha, I'd say the second half of that is more important.
Yeah skitz, that's what I was thinking too. :) got a house full of family in from Arkansas too so working on the truck's gotta wait awhile.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Finally got a little time to do an update on the truck. I'll let the pics do most of the talking though.


5.13s installed. Detroit Locker in rear, Trac-Lok in front (came in the front D44 I bought). Will probably change the front to a selectable locker sometime in the future. Started setting up the gears myself -- man what a pain!. Got the front pretty close -- would have been OK for a front diff, but not perfect. Rear was just kicking my butt so i took them both to a local shop called (oddly enough) The Rear End Shop and had him finish up. Guy's name is Barry Armstrong. GREAT guy and definitely knows his stuff. Got both diffs finished up for $300.


Rearend almost complete. Just gotta set the pinion angle and weld the spring perches in place. Upgraded to 1/2" studs. OEM was 7/16" which is actually smaller dia. than our OEM studs on the 355s (12mm).


Got a steering box for a Jeep J10 pickup. Tucks all inside the frame rail so leaves room in the wheel well.




Hi-Steer & Crossover. 1 Ton Tie Rod Ends & 1 3/4" x 1/4" wall DOM. Right-hand flat-top steering knuckle & forged hi-steer arms from Parts Mike, also Pitman arm. Left-hand flat-top steering knuckle OEM.


Had to notch the Trail-Gear cross-member between the spring mounts to clear the steering box. thought later, should've just run the 3" tube full width. Would've been cleaner. Oh well.


So here's what it looks like all mocked up right now (sorry for the crappy pics). Body lift is off and it's sitting on the suspension, but with the axles on jack stands. It is at ride height though so even though the tires are just rolled up there, that's what it's gonna be. Gotta get the sliders back on it so my wife can get in! :-D



 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
Thanks for all the support guys. I'll try to just address some of the questions generally and with a few more pics.

No, this ain't my first rodeo. Although, I can honestly say it is the first time i've cut up a frame and i swallowed real hard before I did. :lol: But like they say, the first cut is the hardest.

I couldn't have answered the question about the steering shaft before today 'cause I just ordered the stuff yesterday and got it this morning. So . . . these pics are hot off the press. I haven't measured, but there's a couple of inches between the frame and the double-D shaft Steering linkage was stupid easy. Just bought the shaft and a u-joint. For my box it was a 3/4"-30 spline on one end and the double-D on the other. There is no collapsible shaft like the factory 'cause they wanted about $275 just for that, but as long as you can actually get the shaft in place the major issue is that there is enough mis-alignment in the column/shaft/box that it will collapse by "knee" action in an frontal impact. I think there is in mine, so a collapsible shaft is unnecessary. And the way the U-joint on the steering column is made, you can just remove the bolt and lay a 3/4" Double-D shaft right in place.
Don't know if the Chevy 1 Ton box will fit, or what the input shaft specs will be, but if you can find one cheap at a salvage, spring for it and see how it fits. The Jeep J10 box seemed pretty compact and could not have fit any better.






Got the hubs and brakes all finished up today also.



And . . . made a trip to San Jose to South Bay Driveline for . . . well, you can guess I think. Drivelines should be ready next week.

Yes, I did narrow the front housing 2 1/4". Target WMS is 65". Just today got the hubs on so I guess I can check it now, but haven't had a chance to do that yet. Had West Coast Frame and Collision up in Sacramento actually do the welding on my front housing. Just read too many conflicting reports about how to weld on those castings, so decided to leave it to a pro. Also was going to have to rotate the inner C's for caster angle and that's a little beyond the precision and the force of any of my tools. Cliff did a great job. He also modified my transfer case flange to match the saginaw CV I had already bought, and machined an adapter ring to mate the two pilot bores together. Very simple and came out pretty sweet. No pics right now, but I'll get some when I get the drivelines back.

Rearend is a kind of mixed up deal. Bought a rear from a '77 J10 about 2 years ago, or so, and after it sat around a while and I decided not to spring for the jigs, etc., to rework the tubes myself took it to Fresno Four Wheel Drive Center who had it for over a year before he got it done. Nice enough guy, but doesn't get in any hurry. After cleaning the grease off the original housing, I discovered one of the tubes had been broken at some point and the guy who tried to weld it up needed to go back to doing whatever else he was doing before he decided to try welding. Rather than re-tube that housing FFWDC found me another housing that was closer to the dimensions I needed anyway, and using the bearing cups from the original housing, set it up for the target 65" width and the axles I had already bought from Dutchman, through BJ's Offroad. Specs match a '86-'88 Jeep J10.

Also, may have mentioned this before, but I ended up taking the diffs to Barry Armstrong at The Rear End Shop, here in Livermore, who is a great guy and also did a super job. If you guys in the area have need of any of their services, you won't go wrong dealing with these guys.

As far as getting it done already . . . I'M TRYIN'!!!!! LOL Seriously, I'm doing everything I can do to have it functionally wrapped up by the end of this week. I'll be out of town all next week, then we're SUPPOSED to run the Dusy-Ershim trail the following week -- heck of a shakedown cruise!!

More to come . . .
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Looks great.Now I think I can run the steering shaft thru to that box.I gotta lift the rad up to the stock location with a universal upper hose anyways so that will move my lower rad hose up 3" which I am hoping will work for me.I have 1 ton TRE's and Drag link ends coming already.Just need to order the 7/8-18 threaded inserts to build the drag link and tie rod when all the parts get here.Can't wait to see your driveshaft.Sounds like my setup on my beast.
You ought to check with Parts Mike for your adapters and stuff. Reasonably priced and knowledgeable and helpful folks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
I was wondering. Why didn't you go with disc brakes in the rear over the drum brakes?
Time, money, complexity of the conversion, and the difficulty of ending up with a working E-brake. Don't get me wrong, it's in the future plans, just not now. Enough other stuff to worry about already.
 

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
Damn, nice work. Cant wait to see how this comes out.

Just curious, did you consider a 4 link/coilover setup? I have noticed most of the SAS conversions I see on rados are leaf spring.
M_O_Z is right; it was mostly a cost concern. It's easily twice the money I spent on my springs, just for the shocks. Then there's the coils, the links, brackets, etc. It all adds up amazingly quickly.

It was also an engineering/time issue as well. It takes a while to get a link setup right, especially a 4 link. Double triangulated is really tricky to pull off in the front so you still have to run a panhard bar (making it a 5 link). Lots of folks run a 3 link (with panhard) in the front but again, they're tricky to setup well. I also had a deadline I was working toward (which, unfortunately, it looks like I'm not going to meet anyway).

As with the rear disc brake setup mentioned above, the link front is on my mind for sometime in the future. Just have to do things in stages. I'm thinking pretty strongly about going with the Ballistic Fabrication hybrid air/coilover shocks and a radius arm setup like Rusty's offroad uses on the XJ Cherokees. Looks pretty simple to setup but very effective. And because of the adjustability of the air (nitrogen) pressure, the hybrid shocks give a lot of spring rate adjustability without all the trial and error on the coils. Good news is that the shock hoops I will have in place on this build will function for the hybrid coilovers, will just need some additional bracing. So at least some of what I'm doing is working toward that goal. That said, I've seen some pretty amazing stuff from the Trail Gear leaf spring suspensions so I may be satisfied with this and leave it alone. Sometimes "better" isn't really necessary -- cool, but not necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
I plan on doing a SAS but trying to figure out what all is needed to complete it. I've heard and seen a lot of different ways. I've heard you can use the newer jeep axles, if so do you still need to cut them down or are they already the correct width?
Don't have much info on those axles at all, and no experience. I know they will use a unitized hub just as the Colorado does (which I HATE) and that the ABS tone ring count is different so you'll have to have a custom one machined to retain ABS. The good side is you CAN have a custom tone ring machined. I've not yet figured that one out on my setup. So . . . for now, no front ABS. My Front measures 65.25" and the target was 65, so pretty close. Somehow the rear ended up a little over 64". Factory is 63" (nominally). Another good thing about this setup will be that if you're going to link it, you'll already have brackets in place, plus lots of JK lifts on the market you could probably adapt to your truck. Drawback to that plan is cost, and . . . did I mention cost?

If I keep my truck like planned I am going to replace the entire drive train and suspension. Personnally I think they are 1" wider then a stock Z71 axle so I would probably not touch them and this is the same route I want to go. Minus I have to get a transfer case and go to 4wd from a 2wd but thats the fun part right. I am following this build to...
Lots of options depending on what you want and how you want it to function afterward, and . . . how much you want to spend. Atlas: about $2400 - $2600. If you're going from scratch you won't be limited to a passenger side drop on the t-case and axle (which should be mentioned to MickeyD as well. Stock t-case will require a passenger side drop and I suspect your axles you have in mind are driver side). You go with the NP231 from a Jeep if you want a Driver side, or (my personal low-buck favorite) a Dana 300 for the passenger side. you can also go with the NP203/205 doubler combo if you're interested in double reduction. That would allow you to create either driver or passenger side drop, depending on which version of the 205 you acquire. If you're not familiar with this setup, you use the gear reduction portion of the 203 mated via an adapter to the front of the 205. This gives you double reduction for a great crawl ratio. I believe you would also have the option of twin stick shifting so you could control front and rear axles separately for digs, etc. Ford NP205 boxes have the driver side drop and Chevies have the passenger.

From the pics and the posts it looks like the project is coming long real well. Keep up the good work. :thumbup:
Thanks for the kudos.

One parting shot here. If you're gonna dive into this you'd better be ready to do a LOT of research and planning (I've been planning this for 2 years and still had LOADS of surprises and challenges crop up), be probably at least 40% over budget by the time all is said and done, be several weeks or even months without your truck (and probably as much over "budget" on time as money), and perhaps redundantly, be ready to drop some serious coin before it's all said and done. Plan EVERYTHING. When you think you're ready, plan some more. Don't assume you can find salvage parts because sure as you do, you'll end up having to buy new because you can't find them or they aren't available, or they cost more than you planned. Divide the project into segments and work one at a time unless you need to work another for the sake of forward progress while waiting for something on the first one. Did I say, "Plan everything?" While you're planning everything, plan for the worst (i.e. most expensive and longest time). Don't assume your parts will be in stock or that your suppliers will actually ship them in a reasonable time. Resist the urge to begin as soon as you get a few parts on hand. Wait . . . for . . . it . . . You'll be glad you did when you're trying to figure out how your steering system is going to mate up and articulate with your front axle (and that's just one example). If you're the type who likes to slap something together and drive off, just abandon the project now. Plan on Re-doing more than you do. Always, always, ALWAYS T A C K weld your parts until you are SURE they're where you want them because you WILL move them, or you will do it WRONG! Just remember that you are engineering something unique, custom, and so there is probably no one who can tell you EXACTLY how things are going to work together. You're going to have to be willing to back up and re-think, re-purchase, and replace some of the new stuff you just bought because it won't work like you thought it would. Oh, and before I step down, don't overlook the driveshafts. All your work is wasted without them. They'll set you back anywhere from $800 up, depending on what and from whom you get.

OK {steps down} Just sayin'
 

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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
One more thing . . . GOOD suppliers are a great source of help and info as well as parts. Use them. Don't be afraid to ask them questions, but don't expect them to engineer your project for you either. In particular, Parts Mike has been an extremely valuable resource for my project. Morris is great, and obviously has been around the block a few times. Trail Gear has been a major source for parts and pretty helpful as well. You just have to be able to translate Toyota into Chevy. Although not as major of a contributor to the project, RuffStuff Specialties deserves to get a mention here. Very helpful, hardcore parts, and as with the others, I have gotten great service from them. One really cool thing about RuffStuff is that if at all possible they ship USPS Priority Flat Rate (and they really know how to stuff a box). That way shipping is always reasonable, especially for the weight of those steel parts, and you'll have them in 3 days at most. Also, South Bay Drivelines did a great job for me although I do have a couple of issues (not their fault) yet to be resolved there. Maybe some of this can be helpful as some of you guys contemplate and plan your own projects.
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
Did you do shorten the axles yourself or have someone else do them? If you did how much trouble did you have getting everything back to it's correct postions?
I did do the actual shortening myself but see my post on pg. 3, 7/14/2011, 7:46 PM. Look at the text after the last photo. Job cost me $300 and it was money well spent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #85 ·
Yeah I know there are plenty out there it's just a matter of which year group and vehicle to look at. I'm looking at a D44 though and most jeeps are narrower than our axles and are D/S drop. Chevy and Ford kept going back and forth between P/S and D/S drops so I need to know which years have the P/S drop. I've been searching the web but most sites I've found don't tell the drop side on front or rear, WMS and the type of axle it is.
Man, I feel your pain. This took me a TON of research and what I found was that finding what I wanted in a junkyard was going to be virtually impossible. You'll have to decide what width you want to use as a target and then be flexible with how or whether that is exactly achieved. For me, a front D44 out of a full size chevy became available cheap so I jumped on it and narrowed it to the spec I wanted. I was shooting for a 65" WMS so the best options out there were out of a Jeep J10 pickup. Only problem is that there aren't that many of those out there so finding one was either impossible or too expensive. As it is, I have about $350 in the custom length housing, and a trac-lok limited slip. Not too bad considering every Jeep D44 I could find in the right width was $500+. If you want to throw out some specifics, I might be able to help you, but there's just too much info to put into a post -- and, I'd have to go and look up too much of it again lol.

Just a couple of things to consider on which axle to use:

1) Talking about REAR housings, the GM corporate 10 bolt mentioned above uses c-clips to hold the axle shafts into the diff and housing. This is an inherently weak and problematic design when offroad applications are an expected use. When placed under side loading, as the shafts will be when an offroad vehicle is tilted side to side, the narrower portion of the shaft which accepts the c-clip can shear off leaving nothing to hold your axle shaft in the housing. That's an ugly situation in any circumstance, but especially when you're offroad and potentially miles from home. A better choice is a semi-floating design like the Dana 44, or even a full-floating design like some of the Dana 60s, 14 bolts, etc. Obviously there are other considerations when you start looking at the full-floaters, like size, weight, cost, etc. They are big axles designed for heavier duty trucks and so that comes with its own set of issues to deal with.

The full-floaters have a spindle and hub assembly which holds the wheel in place independently of the axle shaft itself. The shaft "floats" in the housing and if it happens to break you'll still have a wheel to roll on, even if you have no shaft to drive it.

The semi-floaters, like the Dana 44 or a Ford 9" use a bolt-on retainer plate that holds the axle shaft and bearing assembly into the housing. Not as strong as the full-floaters, but way better than a c-clip design since you're not depending on a narrow section of the axle shaft to hold it all together.

Again, all this has to do with rear setups. Fronts are all full-floating and have to be because of the steering. Also, from the knuckles out, you can interchange parts from the GM corporate 10 and Dana 44. There is more to that discussion and you have to chose whether you want to use Ford, Dodge, or Chevy parts/bolt patterns, but as long as you stay consistent you can change them out.

2) Before you land on a specific axle housing type, take some things into account. Obviously you have to decide what your budget is and that will affect your other choices. But think about whether you intend to try to setup your gears yourself, whether you want to try to keep things easily replaceable with salvage yard parts, etc. If you're going to try to setup the gears yourself, expect to spend a LOT of time doing it. Especially if you're "starting from scratch" on putting a diff into a housing. If you are just changing gears on an existing diff in the same housing, you can probably do it a lot easier since that diff has already been setup in that housing.

The Dana axles use shims to adjust your clearances and mesh patterns and that can be really time consuming. One place I think the Dana design is better is on the pinion preload since Dana uses shims to create the right pressure on the bearing whereas many other axles use a crush sleeve. Over torque the sleeve once and it's ruined; you'll have to get another sleeve. With the shims, you just shim and check, shim and check, shim and check, shim and check . . . For the Dana 44 you're talking about, don't plan on going bigger than 35" on your tires. I know a lot of folks do and get by with it, but every professional I've talked with says not to go any bigger, especially with really low gears or high horsepower.

Toyota axles, GM 14 bolt, and Ford 9" (I think), use an adjusting wheel on each side of the diff that allows you to literally "dial in" the right backlash, carrier preload, etc. which is MUCH easier than shimming and checking, shimming and checking, shimming and checking . . . ad nauseum. But if you're going to have someone else do all the work most of this becomes moot.

All that having been said, the GM 14 bolt will require a custom fabricated axle to be used in front since it was never manufactured for that application by GM (will be spendy) It's also BIG so depending on what tire size you intend to run, you could actually LOSE ground clearance by going to an axle this big. I personally would not run less than a 37 on a 14 bolt and even then you may want to shave the bottom of the diff housing.

The Ford 9" for the front will be a custom setup as well, but you can get them from Currie if you're willing to spend for them. You can even get a high pinion 9" if, again, you want to spend the money. One thing I really like about the 9" and the Toyotas is that the center section is removable as a unit so it's easy to just pull out and setup on the bench instead of having to pull and man-handle the whole axle housing, or worse yet, work under the truck.

Toyota axles are cheaper and readily available but are IMO too narrow for our trucks. There is a guy on Pirate, though, who did essentially the same thing I'm doing to my truck and used Toyotas. Don't know what he's got on wheel offset, spacers, etc. but it looks like it works for him. Still just a little too narrow to suit me.

For me, the choice of a D44 came down to these things: they have been used in practically everything at one time or another and so housings and parts are readily available; they have a great reputation for strength as long as you work within their limits (you wouldn't want a competition buggy built on them, but they'll do a great job on a dual-purpose rig setup for road and trails, especially in front); parts are reasonably priced because of the high volume of sales and the D44's middle-of-the-road size/strength; and it was "enough" to do what I wanted to do. I originally intended to try to go with 37s on my build, but the cost of the tires themselves was just ridiculous for a street-driven truck, and it was against the advice of a lot of folks who have been doing this a lot longer than me. Also, to get the RPMs in the range I needed was going to call for gears in the 5.38 range and again, that's lower than most people recommend in a D44 because the pinion gets so small it becomes easier to break. So I dropped back to a 35, which will probably be adequate, and definitely better for the D44s anyway, and allowed me to stick with 5.13 gears which will be strong enough and ideal for the tire size.

I know I've thrown a lot at you here, but there is just a lot to consider and I'd like to help you get things ironed out before you get into the middle of the build. You can change horses in mid-stream, but you're gonna get soaked while your doing it! Like I said, throw out some specifics as to what you're looking at, or what you want, and I'll try to give you what info I have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #89 ·
I've been talking to some guys on a 4x4 forum and someone said d44 and ford 9. I'm looking at d44 but not sure on the rear yet. Trying to keep the parts from being as custom as possible in the event something breaks on the trail. I know that our axles are 63" so anything longer than that would be fine. I have seen some that were up to 69" which I don't think would be bad either considering it will give me more stability on the trail. It would be nice to get them were I don't have to go to custom or not custom at all on the driveshafts. Did you do a slip yoke eliminator on yours and put the slip in your drive shaft?
I understand your concerns on the custom aspects. I share them, but ultimately custom doesn't always mean custom. For instance, my front housing is custom shortened, but I am using standard shaft part numbers combined from two applications in order to create the proper length. Only my long side was shortened so that's the only part that I couldn't pull straight from a '69 to '77 full size chevy -- very common. The long side shaft is from a mid to late seventies Ford F-series and full-size Bronco -- again, pretty common. So while I have a "custom length" front housing, there are no custom fabricated parts involved in the internals. That's why I said before, you have to be willing to be flexible on your exact finished length. Work it around what's readily available to accomplish what you ultimately want.

D44 front / Ford 9 rear is a good combo and one you could do fairly cheaply if you're willing to stay with the full width axles. IMO that's too wide, but to each his own. With the 3" swelled fenders and bedsides I have, my tires will be exactly parallel with the fender coverage. If the law enforcement agencies are strict in your area, a full width axle will get you into trouble because you'll have too much tire tread exposed and not covered by the fenders. BTW, full-width on the 77 K10 D44 was 67 3/4" at the WMS.

You've got to look at the whole package though and don't make the mistake of ignoring your steering. The cost will be substantial and the components you use will affect where you can place your axle and/or how much cutting and fabricating you will have to do to make it work. Hi-steering components are far more common for a Dana axle and easier to come by (read that, cheaper). So, do you need hi-steer? If you're going with a leaf spring front suspension, definitely. If you're using links, which are more expensive and more difficult to setup well, maybe not, but why put all that money and work into it and NOT go hi-steer?

Drivelines will depend on your suspension as much as (or more than) your chosen housings. Just mark it down, you WILL have to make SOME modification to your drivelines. Plan on it. Then if you don't have to, it's a happy day. Otherwise, if you assume you can get by without it and then have to spend upwards of $800 to get your newly finished project rolling out the door, it's not a happy day at all.

The crossmember that supports the front of our gas tanks is a major problem with the rear driveline because it hangs below the drive shaft instead of above as in a Toyota setup. Since I went to a spring-over configuration with a 4" lift spring, the driveshaft actually needed to pass through the crossmember. I schemed every way I could think of to modify that stupid crossmember and just never found a solution I liked. I ended up having a custom 2-piece drive shaft made and left the crossmember alone except for welding in two 1" x 1/4" wall DOM sleeves to bolt the carrier bearing through. Since I don't have the truck actually back on the road, I can't say whether this is going to be workable or not. Hopefully I haven't spent hundreds of dollars on a failed plan, but it could happen. That's the nature of "going where no man has gone before."

So with the two-piece driveline in the rear, there are two basic types. one has the slip built into the rear section of the shaft and is called a "fixed mid-ship." The other, which I have and which is cheaper but not better, has a slip-yoke (similar to the one at the t-case) on the front of the rear section (called a "slip mid-ship"). My driveline shop knows this is a custom deal and is working with me on the R&D so if it turns out that I need to make a change to a fixed mid-ship, or to a CV, all he is going to charge me is for the parts, no labor. BTW, there's no SLE kit available for the Isuzu T-150 t-case in our trucks.

My front driveline is a custom CV style with a Saginaw 1330 size CV. I still have issues with the angles between the CV and the pinion so this may end up being unusable when all is said and done. Had a mis-calculation issue when setting the spring perch angle on the front housing so that will have to be re-worked. pinion ended up almost level instead of up 14*. Didn't take into account that the mounting surface on the leaves themselves would not end up horizontal. Oops. That's a hazard of trying to do too many things at once and in too big of a hurry. So now I get to pay the nerd tax and move on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #93 ·
Our brake lines are 10MM fittings and I'm gonna bet that 10 bolt from the K5 has 3/8" SAE fittings. So you'll either need an adapter or new lines (custom), or you'll need to cut the line, replace the fitting, and reflare it. These are double flare lines though so don't think you can use the tool for flaring soft copper. Single flare will not seal and will be dangerous.

On the t-case your gonna have some difficulties with the DS conversion because of where GM put the fuel lines and wiring harness. You could use a Ford version of an NP205, an NP231, an Atlas, or a number of other cases but these are the most commonly recommended for their strength.

It would be far easier to just go with a passenger side diff and swap in a Chevy NP205 or a Dana 300. The Dana in particular is strong enough. It's an all gear case (no chain to stretch or break). And it's fairly compact for the strength it offers. They can be had fairly cheaply and can be upgraded to a 4:1 low range if you're willing to spend the extra change. In the 205's favor is greater strength (but it comes at the price of bigger size) and with an adapter can be mated to the gear reduction portion of an NP203 for double reduction and ridiculously low crawl ratios. A little more money but well worth it if you really want super low reduction and still not as much as an Atlas (which will accommodate either side for the drop).

The atlas is available from Advance Adapters directly, which you need to check out anyway for your adapter. They have a kit to mate the Dana 300 directly to our 4L60E tranny. And since the 205 came behind some 700r4 trannies you might even be able to get the adapter for that setup from the salvage yard. Advance is a great resource for figuring out what you can do. Also check out Novak Adapters. I used one of their kits to mate a Ford T18 Granny Low transmission to my Jeep's Dana 300 years ago. Was really high quality stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #96 ·
If mine ever blows up I'm gonna run a divorced tcase and put it centered in the frame so I can run same length driveshafts.
If you do, you're probably going to be engineering a new transmission/transfer case support crossmember as well. It's too far forward to allow good driveline clearance as it is. If you move the transfer case back, you're almost certainly going to have interference between the front drive shaft and the crossmember. Just sayin'.
 
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