Chevrolet Colorado & GMC Canyon Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,961 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Stopped today at an independent lube shop and a nice young woman there asked if I use any "tire shine" products. As she could plainly see, I had a car wash apply something or other a few days prior.

She told me that such product cause the tire to deteriorate.
She pointed out small cracks and lines in the sidewall of my tires, which are Michelin, a little more than 2 years old, and a few weeks from replacement.

Googling "tire shine..." brought up "tire shine bad for tires".

And I found this, among others:
http://www.crossfireforum.org/forum/detail-shop/38547-tire-shine-bad-your-tires.html
First off, they're assuming that ALL tire shine products contain some sort of petroleum distillate. Not true. But petroleum distillates and silicones are the two most misunderstood and maligned ingredients in the world. Neither is going to hurt your tires, dash, vinyl & rubber trim, etc provided you select a product from a well known manufacturer. Meguiar's, Mother's, Eagle One, Pinnacle, and even Armor All (plus many more) all make products with low shine, high shine or medium shine finishes. Some are water based, some are solvent based, but neither will harm anything. No such thing as a "silicone based" dressing, either, although most water based dressing contain some silicone.

Specifically with regard to tires, any browning of the sidewall is a function of the anti-ozonant material used during the manufacturing process. This component is designed to leech out through the sidewall to prevent the tire from damage due to UV exposure. But these components only leech out when the tire is moving and under load, which is why you see RV owners always covering their tires, and why in the RV industry tires are recommended to be replaced after a certain time period, regardless of mileage. Many large RVs sit stationary for very long periods of time so the anti-ozonants don't do their job properly.

It's also a common misconception that tire dressing cause browning of the side wall, and that's not true either. The browning (technically, blooming) is caused by these anti-ozonants doing their job and you trying to clean any residue from the surface. Any all purpose cleaner will reveal this blooming, and the level of blooming varies from tire to tire, with high mileage tires producing more blooming effect than tires rated for lower mileage (usually high performance tires). Applying a tire dressing that contains some cleaners, and failing to properly clean the side wall first, will also reveal the blooming. In fact, if your side wall is already starting to crack, the cracks can become more visible after applying a tire dressing, but the dressing itself won't cause the cracking.

Overall though, the terms "petroleum distillate" and "silicone" actually encompass a very wide variety of material with very different properties. Depending on the degree of distillation a petroleum distillate can be an extremely powerful solvent or it can be food grade. Yes, you can safely eat some petroleum distillates, and people have been rubbing them on babies bottoms for decades. I like to use the analogy of plants: just because poison ivy is a plant and you would never eat poison ivy, that doesn't mean you should never eat plants or that all plants are bad. Some plants are good to eat (downright healthy even), some not so good (I have a very strong aversion to Brussels sprouts), some only have parts that are good (you'd eat an apple but not the bark of the apple tree, right?) and others will kill you fairly quickly.

Anyone got input on this?
 

·
Retired and Sleeping Late
Joined
·
337 Posts
I've got Michelins myself, little over 2 years old, almost 60K on them, never use any type of tire shine, park in a garage and I have minor checks in mine too. I don't think I've ever had a set of tires that didn't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,961 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I've got Michelins myself, little over 2 years old, almost 60K on them, never use any type of tire shine, park in a garage and I have minor checks in mine too. I don't think I've ever had a set of tires that didn't.

I think the woman was off-base with that.
I have a friend who recently retired as a technician at the Michelin research center in South Carolina. He'll know someone to ask about this.

Running Michelin passenger-car tires and driving it hard as I do, its damned unlikely I'm gonna get more than two years out of them anyway.They aren't gonna fall apart from application of a little silicone spray in that length of time.

And you can be sure that Michelin has probably put a lot of money and research into trying to make those anti-ozone compounds come out black rather than brown.
I'd bet they've tried to find a way to make them come out black and shiny, just like the shiny tire sprays.
 

·
US Army 19yrs and ......
Joined
·
45,273 Posts
I've always used some type of tire shine and I've never had a problem. A set of tires can last me 36-72 months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
Michelins get dry rot cracks really quickly. Cheap tire shines can advance the process a little but tire shine or not, you probably would have had those cracks within 6 months anyways. Silicone-based shines leave tires brown looking when the product fades, petroleum eats away at the outer layer. Bridgestones do this worse then Michelin too (I'm a detailer and have used a variety of tire conditioners over the years and have seen the affects of different types).
 

·
maniac mechanic
Joined
·
5,767 Posts
I always use the armor all in the ketchup style bottle and I have never seen any ill effects. My tires don't last long time wise because I put a lot of miles on a year.
 

·
Camo Princess
Joined
·
6,198 Posts
I've heard this before. Never had an issue with any of it though. I use the meguiars hot shot tire spray (when I remember to) and never saw anything other than I don't keep tires shiny long. I like my dirt roads too much.

But I have seen Michelin dry rot quickly. But I've also seen some last forever before showing any sign of wear. It does depend on a lot of varibles.

Tire mileage rating
Compunds in the tire
How stout the rubber is
Well you get the idea.

The tires that have a higher mileage rating like I think there is a Hankook that has a 100k rating. They are very very stiff. Both tread and sidewall. Which makes for a stuffer ride on some cars.

With that in mind you have to think if you put the tires on and it sits all day everyday in the weatger it's going to affect the life of you tires as to someone who keeps their vehicle in a garage all year isn't going to have dry rotting as bad over the same length of time.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top