Chevrolet Colorado & GMC Canyon Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So, I was probably going to buy a travel trailer to live in for work. Here are the specifications for it:
Dry Axle Weight (approx. Lbs.): 4215
Dry Hitch Weight (approx. Lbs.): 600
Net Carrying Capacity: 2685
Gross Dry Weight - Lbs.: 4815
Gross Vehicle Weight (GVWR) - Lbs.: 7500

If I had a weight distributing hitch and always towed the trailer empty with nothing in the truck except for myself then technically it would be legal, correct?

The truck would be an 09 or newer Z71 4x4 extended or crew cab with the 3.7L, which has a max tow rating of 5500 lbs.

I would be moving it at the most once every few months and could possibly be towing it over 400+ miles on way through some mountainous terrain.

Just asking for opinions, as I really do not want to purchase another truck just to move my trailer once every few months.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,710 Posts
I think if you tow it 400 miles one way through mountains, you may not get it back the same 400 miles as you'll be stranded. LOL

My personal opinion, not a good idea. Since you tow it so infrequently, rent a U-Haul truck to move the trailer to the new location then go get your truck when you return the rental truck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I think if you tow it 400 miles one way through mountains, you may not get it back the same 400 miles as you'll be stranded. LOL

My personal opinion, not a good idea. Since you tow it so infrequently, rent a U-Haul truck to move the trailer to the new location then go get your truck when you return the rental truck.
I did not think U-Haul allowed towing anything except for their own trailers/car dolleys with their trucks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,710 Posts
Humm...that's interesting. I haven't rented a truck so I'm not sure. If th truck has a tow hitch though, should be fine. It would be smart to ask what the engine of the truck is though, in case they have a cheap low power motor for rent. I really don't know, I'm just throwing suggestions out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
So, I was probably going to buy a travel trailer to live in for work. Here are the specifications for it:
Dry Axle Weight (approx. Lbs.): 4215
Dry Hitch Weight (approx. Lbs.): 600
Net Carrying Capacity: 2685
Gross Dry Weight - Lbs.: 4815
Gross Vehicle Weight (GVWR) - Lbs.: 7500

If I had a weight distributing hitch and always towed the trailer empty with nothing in the truck except for myself then technically it would be legal, correct?

The truck would be an 09 or newer Z71 4x4 extended or crew cab with the 3.7L, which has a max tow rating of 5500 lbs.

I would be moving it at the most once every few months and could possibly be towing it over 400+ miles on way through some mountainous terrain.

Just asking for opinions, as I really do not want to purchase another truck just to move my trailer once every few months.



It'd probaly be best to get a bigger truck. But if i were you and you wanted a colorado. Get the 5.3 v8. Hook up trailer brakes. Upgrade to slotted/drilled rotors and then tow with it.
 

·
Dont let the Nation die
Joined
·
15,947 Posts
I'd say get the v8, or maybe even borrow/rent a bigger truck:shrug:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,725 Posts
It'd probaly be best to get a bigger truck. But if i were you and you wanted a colorado. Get the 5.3 v8. Hook up trailer brakes. Upgrade to slotted/drilled rotors and then tow with it.
also super servos and a trans cooler
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,499 Posts
3-4 times a year? I say go for it if we're talking highway in the mountains. Trans cooler, tow in 3rd if the trans starts hunting or temp is too high, and get a ScanGauge to monitor trans temps.

You mention towing the trailer drive... how much gear will you have in the truck?

Does the trailer have trailer brakes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
I have a 07 with the 3.7. I have yet to pull my camper with it (2000 Coleman popup) it ways a little over 3k. I'd say that is as much as I'll put behind this truck. I've pulled the camper all over with my Yukon XL. It is rated about twice my Canyon and I know in the mountains of Colorado on some long grades I either ran slower or let it rev and get hot (I choose slower every time) With my canyon I'd have been crawling I'd guess. ...granted I was loaded with 7 people and all our stuff.

Now around here with less people/stuff I'd think it would be ok. Pushing 5K I'd be carefull.


BTW
Did 2009 get an increase in tow rating. I thought mine was rated at 4k....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,307 Posts
I found the limits of my 3.7 Crew cab with this trailer.

5,291lbs of total trailer weight (trailer + load)

I had to drive so slowly cause the brakes really had a rought time stopping that trailer, on hills the truck went to 2nd gear most of the times.

I seriously would not recommend to exceed the 5,500 lbs tow rating stated in the owners manual.

 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
I found the limits of my 3.7 Crew cab with this trailer.

5,291lbs of total trailer weight (trailer + load)

I had to drive so slowly cause the brakes really had a rought time stopping that trailer, on hills the truck went to 2nd gear most of the times.

I seriously would not recommend to exceed the 5,500 lbs tow rating stated in the owners manual.

Does it have trailer brakes. If not it may make a big difference on stopping.

Even with my unloaded utility trailer I give myself extra stopping room. I figure even without a trailer I'll decide how far I need to be away from the car in front of me and always stay farther back... I prefer not to rear end anyone again. (did this to a Lexus SUV in my Yukon XL 4-5 years ago while looking for a UPS drop off) My only accident I ever caused. Totally my fault as I was distracted... So I tend to stay pretty far back from people, and even farther if I am towing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,307 Posts
Yeah well that trailer has not electronic brakes, I know that with some tricks to the tranny, suspension, engine, and trailer brakes I can push the limits of my truck maybe another 1,000 lbs more. But anyway I think that the frame and axles plays a very important part in this towing game... so even with all those bells and dingles I would not push this trucks above the manufacturer rate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts
worse case rent home-depo truck if your worried uhaul wont let u tow with there trucks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,499 Posts
You need to pay attention to the GCWR (gross combined weight rating = truck + trailer + gear + people) AND the GAWR (gross axle weight rating = max weight on either front or rear axle).

The reason GM recommends running a weight distribution hitch with heavier trailers is to keep the rear axle weight rating from being exceeded. As long as you don't exceed these ratings, you're legal and within the trucks capabilities.

Edit: The GCWR & GAWR is located on the certification/tire label on the driver-side center pillar (B-pillar).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,710 Posts
Even with my unloaded utility trailer I give myself extra stopping room. I figure even without a trailer I'll decide how far I need to be away from the car in front of me and always stay farther back... I prefer not to rear end anyone again.
That is all well and good if you are in control of every situation. However, you are not in control. Hills are going to suck to descend. Traffic will pull in front of that gap you are keeping as your safety zone. You can't buy a trailer and use an inadequate truck to tow it with and say "I'll be a safe driver" because that is absolutely not a resolution.

A copule of weeks ago, a 3/4 ton Ford with a horse trailer plowed a car from behind, pushing it into the oncoming lane which happened to have a big rig approaching. A child died during the accident, the rig was rolled over and the car was in flames. There is no resolution to what happened here but you can see the damage of the Ford Truck was to the corner as if it were swerving to avoid the car. The news reports the car slammed on the brakes to make a left turn last minute. That left the truck with no option. I'd like to believe the driver of the Ford had every intention of 'being a safe driver' too.

If you know anybody with a boat, or any sizable trailer I'd suggest hooking it up to your truck and heading for the hills. See how it pulls. Witness firsthand how the transmission is constantly hunting. Notice that your foot is mashing the throttle to keep it going. And most importantly, notice that the brakes aren't superb. But not only that, they will get hot fast, and fade with repeated braking during your descents.

A load leveling hitch may help, but it doesn't mean the overall weight is reduced. You are still dragging 5,000lbs (or whatever you said first) down the road.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,499 Posts
And that is why you have trailer brakes for larger trailers -- to keep the truck's brakes from being over-worked. Engines aside, I believe the brakes are the most easily felt weak points with the 355 platform while towing.

I just towed a 5klb trailer this past weekend w/ ~100mi highway miles & ~15mi of very hilly one-lane fire road/trail miles. My trailer has electric trailer brakes on each axle hooked up to a brake controller within the truck. I had to perform one panic stop when a car pulled out in front of me; if I didn't have trailer brakes, the truck's brakes wouldn't have been adequate for that scenario (I am a cautious, safe, space-keeping driver). FYI, on steep dirt/gravel hills at less than 5mph, I recommend keeping the truck in 4LO.

As a disclaimer, I also have the 5.3L, so I don't have to worry about the engine overheating; additionally, the extra power allows me to stay in 4th longer than I would have with my '06 3.5L, which prevents excessive hunting. I also watch the trans temp in two locations, engine temp, & trans line pressure with two Aeroforce gauges when towing.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top