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They will stick out more than the stock wheels do but should be ok , a 10 wide wheel is a bit wide for that tide but they work

Are you lifted at all ?

I'm sure more people will chime in on this also
 

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I would stick to a 9" wide wheel at the most for a 10.5" wide tire
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well they're only $200 for set ??

They actually look good when rolled up next to truck. I just don't want to spend money on tires when mine are new and was looking for 15" rims.

I know they're going to be pretty flat with rims no bubble but would they clear? Backspacing looks really close.

They're odd though, they are steel wheels with billet aluminum centers that were chromed. Claims they were custom off road rims??

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Just because they are affordable doesn't make them the best option.

I think 10" wide wheel is too wide also. Go to the tire manufacturer website and see what they recommend for the tire you have.

The cheap wheels will possibly cause premature tire wear. Also they are probably really heavy compared to stock causing you to spend more in gas.

4.75" is a good backspace. It's split between what usually works on a Z85 and Z71.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I don't know about custom but they look like old centerline or ultra wheels from the late 90s
They're actually precision wheel components. They are steel rims with billet aluminum centers welded?? I didn't even know you could weld aluminum to steel??

I also know that they're not recommended for my my 31.5x10.5x15 all terrains but like how they look next to my truck, just don't want to rub. I can eventually raise the torsion bars and realign when the tires wear out. Guy claimed he was running 32x11x15 on his Tahoe with them b4. Good thing is they are large bore too.

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I know back in the day I had a set of CCI wheels that were made this way, I don't know the process, but they were called composite wheels, I kind of just assumed that there was a steel skeleton inside the aluminum, kind of like GM's new "chrome clad" wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I know back in the day I had a set of CCI wheels that were made this way, I don't know the process, but they were called composite wheels, I kind of just assumed that there was a steel skeleton inside the aluminum, kind of like GM's new "chrome clad" wheels.
The rims are metal and chrome and a magnet sticks but the centers are billet aluminum and chrome and a magnet won't stick. Not sure if u can see the back of rim or not and the welds along with tabs they used for alignment?

They're Dirty!



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Discussion Starter #13
The rims are metal and chrome and a magnet sticks but the centers are billet aluminum and chrome and a magnet won't stick. Not sure if u can see the back of rim or not and the welds along with tabs they used for alignment?

They're Dirty!

Actually after re looking at this pic they may be cast allows centers and chrome??



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Here's a description of the construction process for Cragar SS wheels, but no mention of a steel skeleton behind the face, so I have no idea exactly the face and rim or welded together, but this process has been used for years, just don't see it used anymore.


The most popular custom wheel design ever since its creation by Roy Richter in 1964: the Cragar S/S rim has long been a muscle car necessity. This 2-piece composite wheel has a chrome-plated steel rim welded to a chrome-plated aluminum [email protected]#
 
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